Wiring outlet to wall switch


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Old 05-15-19, 08:13 AM
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Wiring outlet to wall switch

I'm rewiring a livingroom from a sixties house that has a wall switch controlling one wall outlet as there is no ceiling light. I'm putting in grounded mc 14/2 wire. There are six outlets in the room and i'm wiring them without pigtails directly to the poles on the outlets. Tried to find an online diagram for wiring a wall switch to control one outlet
where there are multiple outlets on the circuit, but couldn't find a diagram that wasn't using pigtails. I have a 14/3 wire on the way, for the switch.....any advice or a link to a diagram showing how to do this without pigtails? Thanks.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 08:18 AM
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Confused. Why don't you want to pigtail?
 
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Old 05-15-19, 09:49 AM
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The correct way is to use a pigtail. What you're doing is essentially wiring each outlet in series. (I think.) A photo would probably be useful. These aren't GFCI outlets, are they?
 
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Old 05-15-19, 09:57 AM
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We need a better description of how the cables run.
The only time you need to use pigtails is when there are more wires than screws on the receptacle. You are not permitted to put two wires under one screw.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 12:39 PM
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Use 14/3 cable between the outlets until after the outlet that is switched, when you can go to the 14/2. This allows you to have both switched and unswitched (i.e., continuous) power available until only the unswitched power is needed for the remaining outlets.

Daisy-chaining the hot and neutral lines through outlets is an approved and common practice, although pigtailing provides some advantages. Pigtailng the neutral is required in multiwire branch circuits which share a common neutral wire along with hot wires from both phases. This is to prevent a disconnected neutral at the outlet from allowing the neutral voltage to float and causing an overvoltage on one leg of the circuit.

If you daisy-chain the outlets use only the screw terminals or the clamp connections, not the "back stab" holes in the back of some receptacles.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 06:19 PM
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These are not GFCI outlets. The room was ungrounded, i'm switching out the old no-ground wire with grounded wire and outlets. I only want one outlet controlled by the wall switch. I haven't decided whether the power is going to go to the switch first or one of the outlets. I don't want to use 14-3 wire in every outlet - I thought I'd only need it for the connection from the switch to the controlled outlet. It seems that if the controlled outlet isn't the last outlet and needs to pass power to another outlet, that I'd need to pigtail, as there would be a 14/3 from the switch, a 14/2 passing power from another outlet, and a 14/2 powering another outlet. So, the only way to avoid pigtailing is to have the switched outlet either the last outlet or have the switch receive power first, before any outlets....If power goes to the switch first, the controlled outlet would have to be split so that the switch wouldn't effect any downstream outlets......Is this correct?
 
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Old 05-15-19, 06:49 PM
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.If power goes to the switch first, the controlled outlet would have to be split so that the switch wouldn't effect any downstream outlets......Is this correct?
Either one side or both sides can be switched.

Running power to the switch first is the easiest way to meet the new code requirement that all switches have a neutral even if not needed if a neutral can't be added easily at a later time.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 07:33 PM
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That would not be a "pigtail". That would be a simple connection with a wire nut however.

A pigtail is a is two or more conductors connected together and a short 6 inch pigtail included to connect to the device.

Correction
Iit would be a pigtail at the switch but not at the receptacle.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 08:32 PM
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Iit would be a pigtail at the switch but not at the receptacle
Yes. No easy way to totally avoid a pigtail but nothing wrong with a pigtail. Certainly better than using the back stab.
 
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Old 05-15-19, 09:24 PM
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Thanks for the graphic, that is clear. Power to the switch first seems the best, simplest route.
 
 

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