adding outdoor washer and dryer


  #1  
Old 05-28-19, 01:07 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: st pete florida
Posts: 232
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
adding outdoor washer and dryer

I've read over the codes https://www.nfpa.org/NEC/About-the-N...58&access=open

But still have some questions.

I plan on adding one 20A 115vac breaker and one 30A 230vac breaker. Then running the wires in two conduits thru the block wall from inside garage to the outside. then securing to wet rated surface mount boxes, one each for the 115vac and the 230vac electrical socket receptacles.

The boxes and enclosed covers will be wet outdoor rated.

The receptacles will be GFCI.

I believe the codes said I needed a cutoff outside the house. Why?

When I read the codes a few years ago, I though I read mention of 4 prong required for the 230vac and I think there was also instructions on how to hook up a 4 conductor cord to the older 3 terminal dryers, but i cant find that now.

Any advice will be appreciated.

paul
 
  #2  
Old 05-28-19, 01:40 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,575
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Nominal voltages are120v and 240v. No GFCI required on the 120/240 dryer receptacle but a GFCI breaker would be a good idea. Yes, 4-wire for dryer. Receptacle and plug is a disconnect means. GFCI required for washer.
 
PJmax voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 05-28-19, 03:24 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 70,117
Received 2,961 Votes on 2,672 Posts
If you are installing a dryer outside..... put it on a four wire circuit.
It is very easy to convert three wire dryer wiring to four wires.
 
  #4  
Old 05-28-19, 05:05 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,295
Received 319 Votes on 285 Posts
If it's easier, you could run one 3/4" conduit with the (3) 10ga wires and (2) 12ga wires and one 10ga ground. The conduit can go into the first box, then use a nipple or conduit to go to the second.

Of course, two separate conduits are fine too.
 
  #5  
Old 05-29-19, 03:52 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Ct.,USA
Posts: 2,639
Received 182 Votes on 162 Posts
Unless the appliance is under cover, I don.t think they will last long before the elements win out. Why don't you just put longer power cords on the appliance and put the outlets inside the garage?
 
  #6  
Old 05-29-19, 03:10 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 11,151
Received 164 Votes on 147 Posts
I thought I read mention of 4 prong required for the 230vac and I think there was also instructions on how to hook up a 4 conductor cord to the older 3 terminal dryers
The age of the dryer has no bearing on whether there is a 3 terminal strip, all dryers have three screw terminals. The 4th wire is a ground and goes to the green ground screw usually to the left of the 3 terminal screws. A 4-wire circuit with 4-prong receptacle and matching cord is required for a dryer's 120/240 volt circuit and the same is true for electric ranges.
 
  #7  
Old 05-30-19, 09:28 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Southern Arizona
Posts: 157
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
Outside laundry

If you use a single 20 amp outlet for the washer it does not need to be ground faulted. If you mount the outlets either above or to the side you can satisfy the disconnect issue by unplugging the cord. Not that easy for the dryer but doable. If your doing this in cold country remember the water lines can freeze. Insulation may be enough depending on your location
 
  #8  
Old 05-30-19, 01:09 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 11,151
Received 164 Votes on 147 Posts
If you use a single 20 amp outlet for the washer it does not need to be ground faulted.

Maybe not by your local AHJ, but by the NEC it most certainly needs to be GFCI protected.
 
  #9  
Old 05-31-19, 02:40 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,389
Received 148 Votes on 131 Posts
Why don't you just put longer power cords on the appliance and put the outlets inside the garage?
The Code requires the receptacles to be located in the area of the equipment. Also the cord cannot extend through walls etc.
 
  #10  
Old 05-31-19, 01:39 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: st pete florida
Posts: 232
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
is that to code?

What about pulling the 115 off of one side of the 230, like my stove does?
 
  #11  
Old 05-31-19, 01:44 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: st pete florida
Posts: 232
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
where is the quote?

Why did I get email notice for the 1st two replies, but no more?

This forum requires that you wait 180 seconds between posts. Please try again in 51 seconds.
 
  #12  
Old 05-31-19, 01:48 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: st pete florida
Posts: 232
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"one 3/4" conduit with the (3) 10ga wires and (2) 12ga wires and one 10ga ground. The conduit can go into the first box, then use a nipple or conduit to go to the second."

is that to NEC code?

What about pulling the 115 off of one side of the 230, like my stove does? (yes I know Ill need a larger breaker)
 
  #13  
Old 05-31-19, 02:20 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,575
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
Yes multiple voltages in one conduit, no to using one side of the 240 because the washer needs its own breaker and that can't exceed 20 amps for a 120v receptacle.
 
  #14  
Old 05-31-19, 03:26 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,389
Received 148 Votes on 131 Posts
What about pulling the 115 off of one side of the 230, like my stove does? (yes I know Ill need a larger breaker)
No it is not. Each require a dedicated circuit. You also cannot have regular receptacle on circuits greater than 20 amps.
 
  #15  
Old 05-31-19, 05:42 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: st pete florida
Posts: 232
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
anything else I need to know?
 
  #16  
Old 06-08-19, 06:19 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: st pete florida
Posts: 232
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
concerning the 4th gnd wire.

Some say: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tdrvbMTctg

several sites agree with above, but others instruct differently, as shown here: https://www.thespruce.com/change-dry...g-to-4-1152248

which is correct?

tks,
paul
 
  #17  
Old 06-10-19, 07:17 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Southern Arizona
Posts: 157
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
the U tube is WRONG. The previous codes for dryers and ranges was 2 hots and a ground. Then with the advent of electronics and 120v timers the NEC updated and required the neutral (grounded conductor).
As the text in the Spruce link shows the neutral is isolated/insulated at the dryer, not attached to bare metal. Just like the hot wires. That is because you do not want any other ground/neutral connections except at the main electrical service where the neutral is established.

You mention that you have an situation at your range where you have 120v being created as part of the 240v circuit for the range. This is WRONG. The overcurrent device is set to protect the wiring feeding the range not the
#12 wire for the receptacle which is usually 15 amp. tapping off for any 120v loads is not not safe. This was explained at the dryer but not at the range when I reread the posts.
 
  #18  
Old 06-10-19, 07:26 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: st pete florida
Posts: 232
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So 2nd video is the way to go? Since then I've even found other ways 3 and 4 different ways shown. One vid explained two different ways and said that I need to find out from the original maker of the dryer.

240 Stoves ovens used to b made that way with the 120 plug up front. Back in the good old wild west days.
 
  #19  
Old 06-10-19, 09:03 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,941
Received 45 Votes on 43 Posts
I didn't watch the video, but I jumped through it and every time the video stopped there was something wrong in the frame; so I would say do not follow whatever he said.

The Spruce link looks OK for the cord swap procedure. The biggest difference between manufacturers is that some you will have to remove a bonding wire between the case and neutral, and some you will need to remove a metal strap.
 
  #20  
Old 06-12-19, 09:54 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 11,151
Received 164 Votes on 147 Posts
The You Tube video is definitely wrong! At the end of the video the guy was even showing a 50 amp rated receptacle and plug as a dryer receptacle and plug. As far back as I can remember dryers always required 2 hot conductors and 1 neutral conductor and the grounding was done through the neutral conductor. The third conductor had to be a neutral and not a ground because the electric motor and controls all operated at 120 volts and not at 240. The 1996 NEC changed all that and required a 4th ground wire on all electric range and dryer circuits and that the neutral be kept isolated from ground. But, I still recently have seen a few new homes built in areas with little regulation where 10-2 NM-B cable is used for a dryer circuit.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: