Issues with GFCI and dishwasher

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Old 06-25-19, 09:35 AM
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Issues with GFCI and dishwasher

I had my kitchen remodeled nearly a year ago. During this time my dishwasher was plugging into a GFCI under the sink. Recently the gfi started tripping and the dishwasher would not finish a cycle. I figured something in the dishwasher but two different repair guys swore up and down it was due to the dishwasher being plugged into a gfi and not a regular outlet. This is under the sink so i would rather not have a regular outlet there, so instead i thought to change to a new gfi. That didnt resolve the issue, but I read where using the holes for wires instead of the screws MAY cause this type of issue. So I installed the original gfi using the screws and not the holes in the back. Using the holes was originally the way the electrician wired it up.

Now for reasons I dont understand, the gfi is tripping when the dishwasher is not in use, or possibly at the very end of the cycle. Dont quite have it figured.

Questions. Is there really something to this concept of using a standard outlet vs using a gfi? I dont think so but I am not an electrician, but neither are the dishwasher repair guys.

Any other thoughts about this? Thanks!
 
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Old 06-25-19, 10:08 AM
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On a standard receptacle..... the holes in the back for wiring are called push-ins or stabs. It's just a friction fit. With a GFI receptacle..... the holes in the back allow the wires to go under a plate that the screw tightens against. Those holes are perfectly acceptable to use. This method is used to keep the screws tighter to the unit. When you wrap the wire around the screw.... typically it's too wide to fit comfortably in the box without shorting.

Usually when a dishwasher starts to trip a GFI circuit it's because the heating element gets a leak to ground in it.
 
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Old 06-25-19, 12:27 PM
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There are more than one kind of GFCI. There is the common outlet to protect people trips around 5 miliamps of current. WHICH HATE MOTORS. Then there is another ground fault for protecting equipment, around 30 miliamps of current. The easy fix is to remove your offending outlet and replace it with a 20 amp model available at any box store or hardware store. The correct way is to contact someone at a electrical supply store, not an big box store. Purchase a equipment ground fault receptacle.
Say thank you to your contractor for not knowing the difference.
 
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Old 06-25-19, 08:35 PM
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The latest codes require the gfi protection.

The UL standard leakage amount for motors should be below the trip level of a 5mA gfi device.
 
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Old 06-26-19, 04:20 AM
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Drangd, What is the mfg.# for this GFCI with the 30 ma. rating ? It would appear that these types of devices are not intended for this use, best option would be to find the problem and correct it.
https://legacy-uploads.ul.com/wp-con...iveDevices.pdf
Geo
 
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Last edited by Geochurchi; 06-26-19 at 05:37 AM.
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Old 06-26-19, 06:17 PM
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The easy fix is to remove your offending outlet and replace it with a 20 amp model available at any box store or hardware store. The correct way is to contact someone at a electrical supply store, not an big box store. Purchase a equipment ground fault receptacle.

No manufacturer makes a 30 mA trip GFCI receptacle, they are all 4-6 mA trip. The only way to get the 30 mA trip is to buy a 30 mA trip GFCI breaker from a supply house, but that wouldn't meet code for a dishwasher. The GFCI receptacle does not need to be 20 amp rated, a 15 amp rated is all that is needed or required.
 
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