Gfci

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Old 06-27-19, 01:26 PM
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Gfci

i have an old circuit that use to run the downstairs dryer. The breaker was a 30A double pole and has a 10/2 line wire. Iíve been working on an addition and want to repurpose this circuit for a sump pump.

Iíve reduced the breaker to a double pole 20A breaker and junctioned the line wire down to 12/2, which then feeds into a 20A GFCI. I recently noticed the Load side of the GFCI showed melting/burning, but other than the sump pump plugged into the front of the GFCI, I had no wires extending out the load side on the back.

Iíd really appreciate any insight on what Iím doing wrong. Thanks in advance for your feedback.
 
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Old 06-27-19, 03:01 PM
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If there is burning where the wire connects I first suspect a bad/weak connection. I assume the wire is copper. Was it bright and shiny clean? Was the screw terminal tightened down firmly?
 
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Old 06-27-19, 06:00 PM
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The effected area of the gfci was the load portion where there were no wires run from the gfci. This is a single outlet (GFCI) circuit where only the sump pump plugs into the gfci. Everything was tightened down well.
 
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Old 06-28-19, 05:34 AM
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I’ve reduced the breaker to a double pole 20A breaker and junctioned the line wire down to 12/2, which then feeds into a 20A GFCI.
Are you sure it's wired for 120V operation? Why the double-pole breaker?
 
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Old 06-28-19, 06:33 AM
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The breaker was a 30A double pole and has a 10/2 line wire.

That was a code violation and an accident waiting to happen, it's good you discontinued using the dryer on that circuit. Yes, the circuit can be repurposed as a 120 volt circuit, but ibpooks asks a good question, why the double pole breaker?


I recently noticed the Load side of the GFCI showed melting/burning, but other than the sump pump plugged into the front of the GFCI, I had no wires extending out the load side on the back.
Melting or burning is typically due to a loose connection, but you have nothing connected to the "Load" terminals. Was the GFCI receptacle used or a new one? If you just purchased it, were the terminals burnt when it came out of the box? It may have been a return if it was purchased at a box store. If it were mine I'd probably replace it with a new 15 amp GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 06-28-19, 08:03 AM
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I simply replaced the old double pole 30A with a double pole 20A to bring down to 20A. Should I have just used a single pole 20A breaker? Would this make a difference when routing through a GFCI?

Iíll definitely go back and check the connections in the junction box to ensure nothing was loose (Iím positive the connections to the GFCI were solid. The GFCI used was brand new.
 
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Old 06-28-19, 08:28 AM
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In 10/2 or 12/2 you have a black, white and bare wire. The black should go to a single pole breaker or one pole of a double breaker. The white and bare should go to the neutral and ground buses respectively, which may be the same bus if this is coming out of a house main panel.

If it was wired as a dryer circuit, both the white and black would have gone to the breaker; which makes it a 240V circuit. If it's still wired that way that definitely nuked the GFCI and maybe the pump.
 
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Old 06-28-19, 08:57 AM
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Thank you ibpooks! I think youíve identified my problem. Both the white and black were ran to the double pole breaker. Iíll get a single pole 20A and wire with both black and white.
 
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Old 06-28-19, 10:34 AM
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You can still use the double-pole 20A, but the white wire should be removed from the breaker and moved to a screw terminal on the neutral bus. The black wire goes on one of the breaker terminals and the other breaker terminal is left empty.
 
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Old 06-28-19, 11:05 AM
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So, you toasted the GFCI by feeding it 240V?
 
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