Questions before electrical rough-in inspection

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Old 07-14-19, 07:09 PM
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Questions before electrical rough-in inspection

Hello,

i am getting ready for my rough in inspection and have a couple questions to make sure i pass the first time.
1. Do I need to have supply line ran and just not hooked up to breaker box or can I run supply line after inspection?
2. I am installing recessed lighting and want to use the existing line for the current lights in basement. How do I do that for inspection? Do I need to disconnect the current lights and have no lighting until after the inspection or just explain my plan and unconnect that after the inspection?
3. Can I have a smoke alarm on the same line as dimmer switches? I read something that says it may not be a good idea.

Thanks in advance!
Nick
 
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Old 07-14-19, 07:39 PM
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Every inspector does things a little differently but typically.....

Receptacle and switch boxes need to be set and wired. Grounds must be prepped with a tail. Every inspector I know will check the ground in several or all boxes.

Cables do not need to be cut into the panel. They do need to be run if they are going to be covered. The rough-in inspection is open walls and ceiling before covering.

Recessed lighting needs to be in place and wired if they are getting covered. They don't have to light up. So if you need light..... something needs to be temped in for lighting.

Connecting the smoke alarm to a lighting breaker is customary. Dimmers don't affect the equation.
 
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Old 07-15-19, 06:27 PM
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Basically, anything that will be covered needs to be compleated for the rough-in inspection.
 
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Old 08-27-19, 07:54 PM
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Thanks for the help.

Just want to clarify something so I don't go to far before the rough in. I currently have all outlet wires ran and grounds pig tailed. I ran a new main line from the breaker box but have not connected yet. I believe I have done all I need to for the outlets.
For the new lights, I have installed all recessed housing and ran all wiring for them including switch boxes. I am pretty much splitting one room into 2. Currently the entire area(both rooms now that the framing is up) runs off 1 light switch for 3 separate lights. I am planning on using the same/current line for lights in both rooms.
So my question is can any of my new construction be live before the inspection or do I need to have everything up to the point of actually splicing into the existing line to power up the new lights?
I guess I also have the option of using the same new line I ran for the outlets. There is a number of outlets on it, but no major appliances.

Thanks again in advance.
Nick
 
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Old 08-27-19, 08:23 PM
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I use one, two or three lighting circuits for an entire home. No receptacles on any of my lighting circuits.
You can have live circuits. In order for that to happen all splices need to be made and capped so there are no live wires exposed. Typically my lighting circuits are live as soon as I install them. The wiring for the switch is wirenutted together. The breaker is the temporary switch.
 
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