Ac-dc adapter

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  #1  
Old 08-04-19, 02:11 PM
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AC-DC Adapter

I have bought another Driveway Alarm where the Receiver Module uses 3 C batteries.

See page 4
https://manuals.harborfreight.com/ma...3999/93068.pdf


I use a AC-DC ADAPTER 6 VOLTS DC @ 1.6 AMPS for the current one and it has been working for years.. For the new one, I only have a AC-DC ADAPTER 12 VOLTS DC @ 2.0 AMPS. Can I use this for the Receiver Module? Will this be safe or will this be a fire hazard?

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  #2  
Old 08-04-19, 02:53 PM
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NO
3 C batteries is only 4.5 volts. 6 volts might be fine but 12 volts is too big a difference.
 
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Old 08-04-19, 03:38 PM
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Thank you for confirming Joe. OK so I understand the volt now. What about the amps? If both are 6 volts, but one is 1 amp and the other is 2 amp, which would be more appropriate and why? Thank You
 
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Old 08-04-19, 03:41 PM
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You need a supply to be at least the amperage of what you are connecting it to.
It can be larger amperage than needed.
 
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Old 08-04-19, 03:44 PM
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Got it! So volt should be close to batteries while amperage can be more. Thank you to both for your knowledge.
 
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Old 08-04-19, 03:45 PM
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The amp rating on a power supply is max amps it can supply. As long as your load is lower than the supply rating you are fine. The load will only use what it needs not the full rating on the supply.
 
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Old 08-04-19, 04:07 PM
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On page 5, it provided the recommended amp:

Note: An optional 6 volt, 200 mA power
adapter (not included) can be used to
power the Receiver instead of batteries.


If it did not provide this, is there a formula to get the minimum amp that the unit is using? In this case, it is 200 mA. Or do I have to rely on the specification?

I know the basic is AMP x VOLTS = WATTS
 
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Old 08-04-19, 05:22 PM
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would just use the information provided to know the amp draw otherwise you could probably use an amp meter on it and see how much current is being used during operation a lot of multi meters can read amps up to 10 amps dc however with multiple c batteries probably not going to be very easy to hook up.
 
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Old 08-04-19, 05:57 PM
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Unless they gave a wattage the only way to know the amp draw would be to measure it. If the supply is rated 200mA then unit probably much less than that.
 
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Old 08-06-19, 01:28 AM
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Using a multi meters is way over my head for this. So, I will stick with the information provided.
 
  #11  
Old 03-24-20, 11:34 AM
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I have a question about volt referring to a previous question. I bought a fan that is battery power and it said that it uses 9 volt (6 D Batteries).

Fan: https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays...lack/595197703

I bought this Battery Jumper which can power a laptop that is 12v, 16, or 19v.
https://www.amazon.com/Balight-18000.../dp/B07CVTDV4M

I was able to power the fan on and got it to run. Based on Joed's post to stick close to the Volt, will this ruin the fan since it is made for 9v while the output of the battery jumper is 12v?
 
  #12  
Old 03-24-20, 11:59 AM
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The higher voltage could burn out the fan. the fan is likely running much faster it did at 9 volts.
 
  #13  
Old 03-24-20, 12:30 PM
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Thank you Joe. I really appreciate your help on this.
 
 

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