Electrical rough in lights

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Old 08-21-19, 06:25 PM
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Electrical rough in lights

To do an electrical rough in, do I need to know where all my light fixtures will be our can I just rough in a line to the switch and then do the lights later?
i have some rooms with tracks, that's easy, I can take a wire to the middle of the ceiling. However, I have other rooms with spots/recessed - since exact spacing could be an issue because of joist placing, are there any recommendations for what to do with the wiring?
 
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Old 08-22-19, 04:18 AM
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Hi, if this new construction then the recessed cans should be placed in the location where needed.
Geo
 
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Old 08-22-19, 05:43 AM
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My best suggestion is to sit down in each room, figure out what you need lighting for, then draw it out.
I am in the (want to say) middle of a major renovation and have been caught a few times by last minute changes or rush jobs (who know, need a bathroom and a place to cook?).

A couple quick tips;
Bathrooms, know exactly where the center of the sink is going to be. A sink change last minute will make the now off center vanity light look bad.

Pot lights/recess lights and spacing.... Take the number of lights you plan to install in a row, add 1, divide room length by that number = A.
Divide A by 2 = B.
B is the distance from the wall to first light. A is the distance between lights. Do this in both length and width and you have your pattern. If a row of lights is too close or on a joist, shift it over what is needed, and make sure to do that for the entire row so it won't be noticed.
 
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Old 08-22-19, 10:10 AM
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I'd agree, now's the best time to layout your lighting while the ceilings are open and you can see all the obstacles.
You'll want to run your cables to each location, drill and/or staple appropriately. If you're using new construction cans, they'll be fully wired and installed before the drywall goes up.

If you'd rather use remodel cans, or the new pop-in LED lights, you'll just leave the wires hanging at each location. When the drywall goes up, just drill a 3/4" or 1" hole at each light location, feed the wires through, and get the sheets up. Then I go back with either a drywall saw or rotozip type tool and cut out the 4" or 6" hole for the light.
 
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Old 08-24-19, 07:40 AM
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For LEDs I assume you don't wire nut the wires together for the rough in like you would do in the junction boxes because there's no can? Just wire nut the first live wire in the circuit and leave the other wires hanging but not connected?
 
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Old 08-24-19, 03:25 PM
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LEDs I assume you don't wire nut the wires together for the rough in like you would do in the junction boxes because there's no can?
There should be a junction box attached to the light. If you buy a cheap one from China, it will not have junction box and meant to be just spliced in the ceiling to live wires. Those are actually illegal in the US.

Just wire nut the first live wire in the circuit and leave the other wires hanging but not connected?
That is what you will have to do if using remodel lights.
However, if you are getting electrical inspection, this may not pass concealment inspection. You have to use new work lights when the ceiling is removed.
 
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Old 08-24-19, 07:03 PM
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What if I want to buy the lights later?
rough in wiring but with LEDs the cans are built in
 
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Old 08-24-19, 07:15 PM
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You just cannot have wire hanging off the ceiling before the inspection. Some inspector may let you do this, but most others won't.

Technically, if you want to install lights later, you have to pull the cables later as well.
 
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Old 08-24-19, 09:07 PM
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Since the drywall goes up afterwards, do you leave an extra length so the drywall guy can pull the wire through before or after?
the led lights mount to the drywall I believe and not to a joist.

Secondly, where I have a central light that will have a junction box mounted to the joist. What happens if the ceiling has to be leveled 1-2" lower. Do I mount the junction box to the sistered joist so as to get the correct depth for the 1/2" drywall that will go on after? I presume the junction box has a 1/2" tab/stopper on it...
 
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Old 08-26-19, 05:31 AM
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Usually where we don't know the final position of a fixture, we leave a generous loop of romex in the stud bay that can be pulled through the drywall later. I also make a mark on the subfloor and snap a picture with my phone so I'll be able to find it later.
 
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Old 08-26-19, 10:04 AM
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where I have a central light that will have a junction box mounted to the joist. What happens if the ceiling has to be leveled 1-2" lower
If you know where the ceiling is going to fall, add a 2x4 block and attach the box to that at the correct height to be just even with the 1/2" drywall.
Alternately, there are boxes that have screw-depth adjustment. So you can mount it approximately where it'll go, and use the adjustment screws to get it exact. These are great for kitchen counter receptacles which seem to always end up at the wrong depth based on drywall, thinset, tile backsplash, etc.
 
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