Upgrading/moving panel meter

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-30-19, 06:09 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Upgrading/moving panel meter

So I am upgrading my electric service to 200 amps from 100, but to do so I need to move the meter and panel to the laundry room, which is down to the bare studs and sheathing at the moment.
Iím planning for the meter socket to be outside and the panel to be inside, and having an underground service installed. because the outside ground is sloped the meter will be physically lower than the switch panel, but basically in the same joist bay.
So my question is, how would folks connect them.
My options seem to be either:

1. Go out through the top of the meter socket box with metal conduit, and turning into the back of the switch panel using an LB elbow/nipple and 4/0 THHN to make the connection.

2. Go out the back of the meter box, through the siding/sheathing into the joist bay and turn up, also with thhn running through a 2Ē nipple, LB elbow and then conduit to complete the path to the switch panel.

3. Same as #2, except use SE cable in the joist bay without the conduit protection.

All three seem like they would be workable, but #3 seems easiest. Any thoughts are appreciated.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-30-19, 07:24 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,548
Received 331 Votes on 309 Posts
It would be advisable to not go out the top of the meter box due to water leaks.

# 2 is the best and easiest way to go however you cannot bury an LB. It must remain accessible.
That means some type of access panel in the wall.

So you may be stuck with method #3 which is code acceptable.
 
Astoriajeff voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 08-30-19, 08:08 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,903
Received 23 Votes on 19 Posts
Have you checked to see if the power company will allow the meter to be moved? You also need to see if they allow connections out of the back of the socket.
 
Astoriajeff voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 08-30-19, 08:08 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 12,925
Received 52 Votes on 45 Posts
Even if the ground is sloped you should still be able to feed the panel through the back of the meter socket. You don't have to feed the wires in the top of the panel, they can enter the bottom or the bottom back. Many panels can also be fed with the main breaker on the bottom of the panel.

#2 won't work for the reason PJ posted.

#3 would work but you are required to keep the distance of the unfused conductors as short as possible. Running SE cable in a wall cavity would likely not fly so you would need to install a disconnect on the outside of the house.

#1 would also work fine, you just need to be sure to use the proper fittings. In my area, overhead drops are done using steel conduit that connects to the top of the meter socket with no issues. You just need to use a threaded hub. However, I recommend using PVC to avoid bonding issues.

Note: you only need #2/0 THHN copper or 4/0 XHHW aluminum for your feeders in conduit.

Another note: You also could leave the meter socket where it is and run conduit on the outside of the house.
 
Astoriajeff voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 09-03-19, 10:59 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: USA
Posts: 12
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks to everyone for the replies.
Yes, Iím planning on having the panel with the breaker at the bottom, so for me, as short as possible would work out to be about 2.5 feet, although I will probably do a combination meter box and main breaker so I can more easily turn off the power if I need to add a circuit later.
Not sure yet if Iíll go out the top of the box or just do se cable in the stud bay, but everyoneís comments were useful.thanks again.
 
  #6  
Old 09-03-19, 11:28 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 52,548
Received 331 Votes on 309 Posts
Typically with unfused mains..... 5' or less is considered as close as possible so you're ok there.
 
Astoriajeff voted this post useful.
  #7  
Old 09-05-19, 08:50 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,970
Received 21 Votes on 16 Posts
Yes, Iím planning on having the panel with the breaker at the bottom, so for me, as short as possible would work out to be about 2.5 feet, although I will probably do a combination meter box and main breaker so I can more easily turn off the power if I need to add a circuit later.

This brings up another set of rules as the inside panel now is a subpanel. The neutral bus in the subpanel now must be isolated from the panel box and a ground bar kit must be added. You also will need to ground the neutral with the Grounding Electrode Conductor at the main breaker outside and not in the subpanel which now also requires a 4-wire feed between the outside main breaker and the inside subpanel.
 
Astoriajeff voted this post useful.
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: