Lowering a range receptacle

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Old 09-21-19, 09:22 AM
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Lowering a range receptacle

For a while I have been dealing with a range/oven that cannot be pushed all the way against the wall, it can go as far as 3" off the wall and that's it.

The reason for this is the original rough in of the range receptacle back in the 1960s was too high for the range.

The back of the range, as shown in the picture below, has a recess area for the socket and plug but it's not high enough. So the plug is about 1.5" higher than it needs to be.



Here is a picture of the receptacle after I opened the wall.



Before I opened the wall, my original plan was to relocate the 4-11/16" box lower. I didn't know the box was sitting on top of a 1" conduit coming up through the slab, and where the conduit ends is just where the "bend" in the conduit ends. So if I were to cut the conduit any lower I may end up with an end that's no longer vertical for the box. Plus it will be a challenge to cut the conduit without touching the #6 conductors inside. I already went to the panel and tried pulling the conductors back from that end, no luck at all.

I am not sure if it's PVC or EMT. I think it's EMT but it's caked with wall texture sprays I can't tell for sure.

Then my next idea is to mount a new box like below, onto the stud to the right, and connect the two with a 1" conduit. The problem is I need to create three splices of two #6 conductors in the original box. Is that a problem? Do I use the biggest wire nuts I can find, or do I use three copper split bolts, or are there better ways?

 
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Old 09-21-19, 10:18 AM
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That is EMT. Your idea is good.
What's with the straggler metal clad cable ?

Wirenuts that large are a bear to work with.
You may be able to use a pull ell.

The picture shows three types of splices.
I like the type on the right. Compact easy to use. They do need to be taped.

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Old 09-21-19, 10:52 AM
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I also like the idea of converting the existing box to a junction box and installing a new box, but does it have to be fed with conduit? I do see that all other wiring is either in conduit or MC cable. I just think it would be easier to use a short length of NM-B cable unless conduit is a requirement. I would use the big blue wirenuts, never had a problem with them before.

I noticed the MC cable too, it looks like someone accessed 120 volts off the range circuit for something, but that 120 volts would be protected probably at 40 or 50 amps. Not a good situation. I suppose that since the range circuit is in conduit there could be another circuit in the conduit, but the MC cable looks newer so I doubt that is the case.
 
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Old 09-21-19, 01:02 PM
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Can you just take the box off and use a LL fitting to come into the side of it instead of the bottom? Maybe the wires won't be long enough.
 
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Old 09-21-19, 01:05 PM
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The MC cable coming off the top was probably added later. It is two entirely separate circuits with three conductors (one for dishwasher, one for garbage disposer, sharing a neutral on a MBWC). It had to be added later since I don't think garbage disposers were around in the 1950s-1960s?

These three #12 conductors are in the same conduit with the #6 conductors for the range, then they exit the top and run behind the wall to a sink cabinet.

I could use NM-B but the reason to use a short piece of conduit was to stablize the existing box because right now it is sitting on top of the conduit but not fastened to any framing, so you can't move laterally but it can "spin" in place. With a conduit there I would be fixing that too.
 
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Old 09-23-19, 10:38 AM
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right now it is sitting on top of the conduit but not fastened to any framing, so you can't move laterally but it can "spin" in place.

If the box will spin in place the connector isn't tight and the conduit, if used as a ground, isn't providing a reliable path to ground. You need to tighten or replace the connector.
 
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