360 degree max conduit?

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Old 09-22-19, 10:07 AM
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360 degree max conduit?

With buried conduit, does the 360 degree rule apply? Do the vertical 90 degree bends contribute to this total?

And is this more of a rule or a requirement? Meaning, I have a very long run that has a number of bends at the ends. The actual run itself is pretty straight. I can pull the wire through the long run and then add the bends at the ends. I'd rather not install a box in the ground if I can accomplish the entire run without it even thought I would exceed the 360 degrees.
 
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Old 09-22-19, 10:24 AM
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With buried conduit, does the 360 degree rule apply?
Yes. Usually if there is more than that it can be impossible to pull thru due to the drag.

Code requires the conduit system to be completely installed before pulling the wires in.
Where are these 90's..... above ground ? You pass thru any type of splice box.
 
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Old 09-22-19, 12:45 PM
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Two lateral 90's. Two lateral 45's. Two vertical 90's. All underground. The two lateral 90's are very close to the end.

I did oversize the conduit (1") to help with the pull (FIVE 10g conductors). I have no other way to re-route the conduit.

Just curious, what is the logic behind the conduit needing to be in place first? Meaning, if I were to install the conduit piece-by-piece, what would be the hazards to look-out for?
 
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Old 09-22-19, 01:34 PM
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And is this more of a rule or a requirement?
Yes. The rules laid out in the NEC are requirements.

Just curious, what is the logic behind the conduit needing to be in place first? Meaning, if I were to install the conduit piece-by-piece, what would be the hazards to look-out for?
It is too easy to damage the wires when putting it in piece by piece.

Rather than making a hard 90 you are better making a very long sweep with PVC. I'm talking about just make a very large curve in the pipe over 20' or so. Also, if something ever happens to the wires in the conduit (I see it all the time) they can be replaced.

Why would you need 5 conductors? Are these branch circuits or a feeder to another building?
 
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Old 09-22-19, 06:50 PM
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Too many bends create pulling stress on the conductor insulation. They also make it very hard to install the conductors. Imagine two back to back 90s to make a 180 degree turn and consider how that would impact the pulling forces. code legal, but by no means practical.
 
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Old 09-22-19, 07:52 PM
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Why would you need 5 conductors? Are these branch circuits or a feeder to another building?
Powering a storage shed. Was going with 2 hots, common, safety and a control for a switch from my garage.

Also, if something ever happens to the wires in the conduit (I see it all the time) they can be replaced.
OK, this makes sense.
 
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