Non-required circuit

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Old 09-25-19, 08:14 PM
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Non-required circuit

I am planning circuits for my renovation and I have a question about sharing circuits between the kitchen and bathroom.

At present in the kitchen I have the required two 20-amp small appliance/countertop circuits and an additional 20-amp circuit providing power to the outlets that are bout 12” off the floor in the non-countertop walls.

In the bathroom I have the required 20 amp outlet circuit near the sink.

My question is, can I share an additional circuit that would provide one outlet roughly behind the toilet in the bathroom for a washlet and an outlet that would power a tv mounted to the wall in the kitchen, in the same stud bay, but on opposite sides of the wall and in the upper and lower stud bay. It feels like it would be ok, given that that circuit isn’t required, but the bathroom and kitchen seem like there are restrictions on what can be shared between the two. I.e. kitchen can share with pantry, dining room, but maybe not other rooms.
 
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09-25-19, 08:19 PM
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Even though you are exceeding the minimum circuit requirements I would say your plan is not compliant for the reasons you stated.
 
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Old 09-25-19, 08:19 PM
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Even though you are exceeding the minimum circuit requirements I would say your plan is not compliant for the reasons you stated.
 
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Old 09-25-19, 09:38 PM
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A washlet should be a very low consumption device.
It could be connected to the bathroom counter receptacle circuit.
It may possibly be connected as a device to the [load] side of a GFI receptacle.

The wall mounted TV receptacle could go on a lighting circuit.
 
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Old 09-26-19, 10:18 AM
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Thanks for the comments. Thatís basically what I thought. I guess a bathroom isnít quite similar enough to store prepare, or eat food.
Thanks again.
 
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Old 09-26-19, 06:32 PM
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It seems to me that additional receptacles serving kitchen, laundry, etc. could be on any other non-dedicated branch circuits after those rooms/areas already have the required branch circuits installed to code.

This would then not rule out a kitchen counter receptacle not on the two required counter circuits.

The receptacles on the "additional" circuit will need ground fault protection, arc fault protection, etc. if the room or area required that.

The washlet, as would a light or fan, could be hard wired on "the 20 amp bathroom" branch circuit only if that circuit served only the bathroom in which the fixture was installed. A heater or other device expected to use more than half the amperes or watts rating of a circuit should have its own branch circuit.

The fact that a kitchen receptacle is fed by a branch circuit also feeding a bathroom receptacle does not create an unsanitary condition in the kitchen.
 
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