Help: convert DC 4 pin Din into 5.5 mm connector

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Old 09-28-19, 08:30 PM
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Help: convert DC 4 pin Din into 5.5 mm connector

Hi All

I have a psu 19V 180W with 4 pin Din type connector and I wish to change the connector into a 5.5 mm type. Please see pictures attached.
The cable has 2 Negative and 2 Positive wires, the 5.5mm connector has only 3 wires (Red, Black, White).
Should I solder 2 Negative wires to the - Black wire , 2 Positive wires to the + Red of the 5.5mm and leave the White wire alone ?
Thanks for your help.

Tony

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Last edited by PJmax; 09-29-19 at 12:40 PM. Reason: resized pictures
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Old 09-29-19, 12:46 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

The power supply is most likely using four wires. Two positive and two negative to reduce the load on each connector pin. However..... this is only a guess and should be confirmed with a meter. Setting the meter to ohms..... the two black wires should indicate a short and the same for the two red wires. I would also confirm polarity of the wires.

With the plug..... you can use an ohmmeter to confirm which wire is the tip and which is the ring. You must also verify what polarity the device plugs into uses. Typically.... BUT not always.... the center tip is positive. If you guess and it's wrong.... the device can be damaged.
 
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Old 09-29-19, 09:40 PM
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Hi Pete

I know very basic electronic. The power supply was from an old computer. I intend to use this psu for my printer which uses the same power as the computer, but just different plug.
I measured 2 pairs of pins and each got 19V. How many Ohms should I turn on the meter to check for a short ? I knew the plug has 2 negatives and 2 positives.
The 5.5mm connector was a spare I had, it has 3 wires. It seems to fit with the printer. Should I find another 5.5mm with 2 wires only? then just connect 2 negatives to 2 positives to each wire of the 5mm plug.
Many thanks for your advise.
Tony
 
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Old 09-30-19, 12:35 PM
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Set your meter to the lowest ohms scale. Rx1 for an analog type meter.
Stick one probe inside the coaxial plug. Find which of the three colors shows a short. That is the center pin wire and positive in most cases.

Hold the probe to the metal barrel on the side of the coaxial plug. Locate which wire shows a short. That is your negative connection in most cases.

The third wire can be taped off. It will probably be connected to the same place as one of the other two but it's not needed.

Connect the red wires together at the power supply. Connect the black wires together at the power supply. If you measure 19v between the red pair and black pair.... you can leave them connected.
 
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Old 10-04-19, 11:11 PM
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Hi Pete

I traced the wires of 5.5mm plug and I found:
- Black wire goes to the outer side
- Red wire goes to the inner side
- White wire goes to the center pin (inside the plug)

There are 2 options I can wire the plug:
Option 1:
4 pin plug 5.5mm plug
pin 1 Negative ----> Black
pin 2 Negative ----> Black
pin 3 Positive ----> Red
pin 4 Positive ----> Red
Tap off the white wire.

Option 2:
4 pin plug 5.5mm plug
pin 1 Negative ----> Black
pin 2 Negative ----> Black
pin 3 Positive ----> Red
pin 4 Positive ----> White

Which option should I go for it ?
Many thanks for your help.

Tony
 
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Old 10-05-19, 08:52 AM
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Is that a three pin coaxial plug ?
It can't be seen in that picture and most are not three pin.

Did you try that plug in the printer ?
 
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Old 10-11-19, 11:04 PM
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Sorry for this late reply, I was away for an urgent matter.
The 5.5mm plug is not coaxial type, its cable has 3 thin wires. This plug fits into my printer's connector. Pls see picture.
I borrowed a computer PSU with spec. 19.5V - 9.2A, measured this without load, gave 19.65V and 17.20V with the center pin. The printer seems to work happily. The printer's power requires 19V - 9.5A.
I plan to wire the plug with option 2 as I wrote above with the 4 pin psu 19V I have.
What is your opinion ?
Kind regards

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Last edited by PJmax; 10-12-19 at 12:15 PM. Reason: resized pictures
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