Wiring 12v equipment through wall outlets?

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Old 09-30-19, 05:57 AM
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Wiring 12v equipment through wall outlets?

Hey, I've recently seen(I think) someone using a 12v battery and wiring it through wall outlets through plus and minus.
That looked like a really good and easy way to power up my equipment in the field and I thought about doing something similar by simply wiring it through plus and minus, I'll use a 3 head sockets so I'll always connect it the same way and won't confuse between plus and minus, explosions are not very cool(usually ).

So just wondering what do you guys think? Is this a good way? And is it even possible to wire it that way?
Thanks
 
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Old 09-30-19, 06:05 AM
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While it will work, I recommend against it. There is a possibility of plugging that cord to 120V by mistake.

You should use a connector that cannot be plugged into something other than DC outlet.
 
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Old 09-30-19, 06:26 AM
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I'm currently using car sockets, but I just find it not very stable and good(it sometimes disconnects etc).
I could replace all the car sockets to another plug type, but using wall outlet feels really easy to wire and use.

There's no reason for anything to be plugged into 12v(or 220v in my case), as it will be permanently wired to my battery box, and no one should touch it besides me. Though I do understand the concerns.

Just out of curiosity, what would happen in such case?
 
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Old 09-30-19, 06:49 AM
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There is a difference between DC resistance and AC impedance.

Impedance is like resistance as far as the current is concerned but is due to the electromagnetic fields affecting near by wires.
So a ac device may have a fairly high ac impedance but a low DC resistance.
Plug that into your battery box and you may have close to a dead short.

So you could end up KABOOM which as you say is not cool.
 
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Old 09-30-19, 06:56 AM
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Not sure I understood your answer, how does the DC resistance and AC impedance comes into play?
As far as I understand what I'm trying to do is simply a matter of wiring, so nothing should really be related to AC or DC here.
Anything I'm missing?
 
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Old 09-30-19, 07:55 AM
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The way I understand it you have a some 12 V DC equipment.
You also have a 12 V battery box.
You want to wire/mount a 120 volt receptacle to the battery box.
Then change the plugs on your equipment to 120 volt plugs.
Is this correct?

If yes then lets say someone sees the 120 V receptacle and plugs in a 120 V AC piece of equipment.
If I aw a battery box with a 120V outlet I would assume that the box was a battery with an inverter.
 
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Old 09-30-19, 08:51 AM
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I see no reason to use high voltage AC outlets/sockets for DC. If you don't like automotive cigarette lighter style DC outlets then choose a different socket. Just don't pick one that's used for AC. You have many others to choose from.
 
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Old 09-30-19, 12:01 PM
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Keep in mind the poster is from Israel.

If I'm not mistaken...... they use the same type of system that's used in the UK. Round pins not slots like us. 230v 50hz power. In that case..... it wouldn't be as bad using 120v devices if all the appliances had round pins as well as the sockets having round pins. You'd have to look long and hard to find a live 120v receptacle there. However, you could put on a 120v to 230v adapter plug and then connect to 230v.
 
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Old 09-30-19, 01:33 PM
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Thanks for the clarification PJmax, that is indeed correct
This is what the connectors would look like:

That still doesn't necessarily makes it much better though.
 
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Old 09-30-19, 01:55 PM
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No.... that would be just as bad.
The power strip and connectors will work ok but there is always that safety risk of plugging a 12v device into 230v. There would certainly be an explosion.

Not sure if you're on a budget. There are many alternate connectors shown on amazon.
DC connectors
 
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Old 09-30-19, 02:24 PM
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I use PowerPole:

 
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Old 09-30-19, 03:34 PM
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PowerPoles are awesome but a little large here. Smallest amperage is 45A.
They are on the link page I previously left and in the link below.

PowerPole kit

They are almost lifetime connectors. When the wire wears out.... pull the pins out and start again.
 
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Old 10-01-19, 02:05 PM
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There's really no reason for anyone to plug in a 12v plug into 220v or the other way around, and I would probably also use extra protections to make sure it won't happen.

But generally I just want a good and reliable DC connector that I won't need to solder and will be strong enough so it won't get pulled out so easily by a small push.

Anything comes to mind?
 
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Old 10-01-19, 02:59 PM
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Not soldering eliminates a lot of choices.
You can look to twist lock plugs and receptacles but they are rather expensive.
 
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Old 10-01-19, 03:59 PM
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I agree that it eliminates a lot of choices, but since I find screwing types of wiring much stronger and reliable I don't really wish to go with soldering, that is one of the reasons I'd wanted to try using the wall outlet.
 
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Old 10-01-19, 09:06 PM
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PowerPoles come in 15 ampere models. I have a link on my other computer.

In addition to coming in many different colors the PowerPoles are also genderless and polarized.
 
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Old 10-02-19, 03:57 PM
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Here is the link to all sizes of PowerPoles and their accessories.

https://powerwerx.com/anderson-power...-sb-connectors
 
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Old 10-03-19, 08:36 AM
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Here in Norway 12V DC is commonly used in cabins with solar panels and battery bank.
This is the standard used here: https://picture.elektroimportoren.no/big/6910302-1.jpg

The important thing is to have good quality, and no risk for plugging in the 12V equipment in to systems with other voltages.

You also have to consider the importance of voltage drop in the cables.
 
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