dedicated circuit power vent w/h

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-05-19, 08:51 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 67
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
dedicated circuit power vent w/h

I have a dedicated circuit for a gas power vent water heater. Is this supposed to be on a dedicated circuit? ... I like to share it with a battery charger.

 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-05-19, 09:20 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 59,717
Received 1,180 Votes on 1,093 Posts
Usually this question is best answered by the installation/owners manual.
It's not required by code to be on a dedicated circuit but the manual may suggest otherwise.

That brings up another point..... you will need to GFI protect this circuit or use a GFI receptacle.
 
  #3  
Old 10-05-19, 10:28 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 67
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thanks pjmax... unfortunately the manual says it needs dedicated circuit.

My intent was to put a battery charger for a backup pump on the circuit. The pump manufacture states the charger should not go on the same circuit as the primary pump. I know its not because its overstepping the circuit rating. I am guessing its in case pump takes out the circuit.

So did you say I need GFCI because you knew the water heater and charger was in an unfinished basement or because the heater is a water appliance?
 
  #4  
Old 10-05-19, 10:50 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,984
Received 681 Votes on 628 Posts
The water heater shouldn't be a high draw item. I assume they want a dedicated circuit so you don't plug something high draw into the circuit then blame their water heater for a tripped breaker. I would be OK having a battery charger on the same circuit.
 
  #5  
Old 10-05-19, 11:48 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 59,717
Received 1,180 Votes on 1,093 Posts
At one time you were allowed to put the water heater on a single receptacle.... not a duplex.... and it didn't need to be GFI protected. Now everything needs to be GFI protected in an area like that.

The water heater uses about 4A max of power so running both on the same circuit is not overloading it.

If it were me..... I'd put both on the same circuit with a GFI receptacle.
 
  #6  
Old 10-06-19, 02:35 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 67
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the input. The nameplate on the heater says its 5A.

The fan is only .65 A... its the hot surface ignitor that consumes the bulk of that.
 
  #7  
Old 10-06-19, 03:44 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,665
Received 221 Votes on 195 Posts
unfortunately the manual says it needs dedicated circuit.
Manufactures do this quite often regardless of the actual amp draw of an appliance. I think it is more to cover their butts than anything else.

I would also share the circuit.
 
  #8  
Old 10-06-19, 03:54 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 67
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I did put the charger on the same circuit as the W/H.

But technically it is a code violation since I think I remember reading something in the NEC that you must follow manufactures recommendations.

Since I am well within 80 percent of the 20A circuit and the fact I can disconnect the water heater by unplugging it in case I had to work on it I am OK with it.

I wonder if this was an inspected job, would the AHJ ask to see the manual?
 
  #9  
Old 10-06-19, 05:02 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 59,717
Received 1,180 Votes on 1,093 Posts
I wonder if this was an inspected job, would the AHJ ask to see the manual?
Very doubtful. He'd be more concerned with GFI protection.
 
  #10  
Old 10-07-19, 06:58 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,665
Received 221 Votes on 195 Posts
But technically it is a code violation since I think I remember reading something in the NEC that you must follow manufactures recommendations.
That is correct. As mentioned, manufactures only think of themselves and not the real world. Requiring a dedicated circuit for an appliance that only uses 1/4 of the circuit is a waste IMO.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: