Dedicated wire to breaker box for welder

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Old 10-20-19, 02:52 AM
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Dedicated wire to breaker box for welder

I will be running a new wire from my breaker box fuse panel to the garage for a Hobart 140 mig welder.
welder needs 115volts and 20 amps if I read the details correctly.
Will be using 10/2 wire. Can I use a 25amp at the fuse box and a 20 amp single wall outlet? I calculated my wire length at 75 feet, but it might be as low as 60 feet. Breaker box is at the opposite side of the house from the garage..
I want to be sure I can get all the power I need with no issues at all from power source.

My wording may be wrong as I'm no electrician, but hopefully you get what I'm saying





 

Last edited by SavageShooter; 10-20-19 at 03:17 AM.
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Old 10-20-19, 03:01 AM
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Here's some details of what I have.
 
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Old 10-20-19, 03:06 AM
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2 of these pictures are Hobart details.
The review text is what I found in the reviews of a 25amp fuse. I don't know what welder he was using, but it got me thinking maybe a 25amp is a good idea?
I'm not running a extension cord, but that is the info they sent me..
 
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Old 10-20-19, 08:09 AM
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Use 20A circuit as instructions say. If it makes you feel better you can use #10 wire for VD, but the breaker must be 20A when using a 20A duplex outlet.
 
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Old 10-20-19, 10:12 AM
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The welder equipped with a 20 amp plug must be plugged into a 20 amp circuit (with 20 amp breaker).

Had the manufacturer intended to require a 30 amp circuit then the plug would have been a 30 amp plug.

The time delay breaker is the way to go. The rest of the circuit (wire size etc.) is still spec'ed out as 20 amp.

Question: Was the original breaker a time delay breaker or did you have to get a specific brand of breaker that user experience has found to work better specifically because it coincidentally was designed to have an extra long time delay?

The 25 to 140 amps mentioned above applies to the output end of the welder which is a much lower voltage and under normal usage should not cause the 120 volt supply circuit to have to deliver over 20 amps for more than a few seconds.

Don't forget to use round trip distance to the panel when figuring voltage drop. Some voltage drop calculators are confusing to use because it is not clear when they assume round trip versus assume one way distance.
 
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Old 10-20-19, 08:37 PM
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Allanj, if by time delay breaker you mean HACR breaker, because of UL standards most breakers meet the HACR specs.
 
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Old 10-21-19, 03:19 AM
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Great info, thank you.
There alot of bad info going around mostly on facebook groups. I've heard over 10 totally different ways and combinations that was just so confusing, I didn't know what to do as it was making me even more lost on the subject..

My plan now is to just run 10/2 with a 20amp outlet and a 20amp breaker.

Here's 2 images of the wire and outlet I plan to get, but I'm not sure which single pole breaker to get? I have no idea on specs or quality or features. I don't want the cheapest and I don't need a super expensive one. Just need a good quality heavy duty breaker. Any suggestions? I live close by to Lowe's and Home Depot. Amazon if needed.
 
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Old 10-21-19, 03:31 AM
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Here's my panel if that makes a difference? Not sure if some panels use different types of fuses or breakers.
 
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Old 10-21-19, 06:21 AM
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By spec'ed out at 20 amps, I use three percent voltage drop from panel to receptacle and back as the suggested maximum.

A long run spec'ed out at 20 amps could well need be 10 gauge or even fatter although a 20 amp breaker will protect any 12 gauge circuit.
 
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Old 10-21-19, 08:58 AM
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I believe you have a challenger panel. Read this....
Is Your Challenger Brand Electric Panel Safe? - Brubaker Inc.
 
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Old 10-21-19, 10:56 AM
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looks like a GE panel to me??
 
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Old 10-21-19, 02:06 PM
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So GE panels use Challenger breakers?
 
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Old 10-21-19, 02:51 PM
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Ha; yes, you are correct. They remind me of the THQC GE series, but these I see, have the word "challenger" on them!
 
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