Dock lighting needs GFCI?

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Old 10-25-19, 01:12 PM
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Dock lighting needs GFCI?

I'm working still on a dock design. Seems there is NEC rqmts about lighting circuits near pools and in crawlspaces needing GFCI, but anything about a dock siting right over salt water?
 
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Old 10-25-19, 05:08 PM
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Use low voltage DC if at all possible.
 
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Old 10-25-19, 06:16 PM
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Looking in Art 682 (Natural and Artificially made bodies of water), I do not see anything about GFCI protection for lighting. All receptacles, of course, do require GFCI protection.

@ Luke, Why not low voltage AC? It would have the same shock hazard. (none)
 
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Old 10-25-19, 06:29 PM
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Hi, any outside receptacle needs to be GFCI protected and possibly point of use covers , what type of lighting are you thinking about ?
Geo
 
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Old 10-25-19, 07:39 PM
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Thinking of LED with dimmable drivers, like the Ikea stuff. The damp rating demand is a bit of a problem. May have to deal with yet more 3R or 4X boxes. Will tie in to the wireless remote boat lift controls.
Tony: i think dedicated use recepts, like a 30 amp twist lock does not need gfci?? But right alongside, i have a 240v hardwired lift system that does need gfci.
 
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Old 10-27-19, 05:50 AM
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i think dedicated use recepts, like a 30 amp twist lock does not need gfci??
I believe the latest code (2017) requires GFCI protection on all outdoor receptacles regardless of type, voltage, and current rating less than 100 amps.
 
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Old 10-27-19, 07:22 AM
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Tony; do you have access to that text about 100A?
All I have access to is this, from the NEC summary page:

GFCI protection is required by the 2017 NEC for newly installed and replacement 15 and 20 amp receptacles on kitchen countertops, in bathrooms, outdoor areas, unfinished basements and crawl spaces, garages, boathouses, laundry areas, and within 6’ of sinks, bathtubs and shower stalls. GFCI protection is also required for certain appliances that have a history of being a shock hazard. Drinking fountains, vending machines, dishwashers and boat hoists are examples of appliances that require GFCI protection.

I know there has been a lot of pushback to the marinas using 30mA protected service to commercial boat docks feeding both 30A and 50A services, via twist locks.

Here is a good read on the 30mA rule with 2017 code.
https://www.marinadockage.com/techni...s-marina-code/
 

Last edited by telecom guy; 10-27-19 at 07:40 AM.
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Old 10-29-19, 07:53 PM
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do you have access to that text about 100A?
I got my 2017 NEC book out of the truck and it turns out the 100 amp or less rule is for all non-dwelling unit 3 phase receptacles 150 volts to ground or less, and all Single-phase Non-dwelling unit receptacles 150 volts to ground or less, and 50 amps or less. This is for bathrooms, kitchens, and rooftops.
 
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