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Need to replace doorbell transformer attached to electrical panel

Need to replace doorbell transformer attached to electrical panel

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  #1  
Old 10-30-19, 09:28 PM
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Post Need to replace doorbell transformer attached to electrical panel

Hi everyone,

I need to upgrade my doorbell transformer from 16 V 10 VA to 16 V 16 VA, and I have just discovered my doorbell transformer is attached to the lower left side of one of my electrical panels. While I have done a number of electrical projects around the house, I have yet to work on any component that is physically connected to the electrical panel. I have attached photos of this arrangement, even though I know everyone reading this thread knows what I am talking about.

I presume I will have to remove the front panel of the electrical panel to access the connections between house 120 VAC and the transformer. I suspect there is a threaded mount that holds the transformer to the box through a cut-out. Can someone please provide instructions for removal and replacement of this transformer?

Thanks and advance for your assistance. I appreciate everyone's help.

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Last edited by PJmax; 10-30-19 at 10:07 PM. Reason: resized pictures
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Old 10-30-19, 10:03 PM
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Remove the panel cover. You will find the transformer comes with short wires which have been lengthened inside the panel. Trace the black wire to the associated breaker. Turn the breaker off. Remove the wirenuts on the white and black wires. Remove transformer. There may be a green wire that needs to be disconnected.

The transformer should be held in place with a single screw.
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If anything is unclear...... post a picture with the panel cover off.
 
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Old 10-31-19, 11:12 AM
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Since you're new working in your panel, it's usually safest to turn off the main breaker. This will de-energize most of the panel, but you still need to steer clear of the main lugs at the top which will be live.

Always recommend wearing rubber-soled shoes, standing on a piece of plywood, and keeping one hand in your pocket whenever possible. After you do it a few times, you'll feel more comfortable - but you still need to be aware of what you're doing.
 
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Old 10-31-19, 01:04 PM
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PJmax has a good answer, this is pretty different from what I have seen here in Norway :-) but I see no reason for not doing it that way.

What calculations makes you sure that you need going from 10 to 16VA? the pretty tiny cable will at 16V have a considerable voltage drop at only 1 A. Depending on what you are going to supply from that transformer, e.g. e doorbell, sometimes a rectifier, and a capacitor may help you out of the need of more energy for as little as one second. It may not be the solution to cover your needs, but low voltage circuits need different thinking than regular voltages. (110V and up)
 
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Old 11-02-19, 03:05 PM
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Thanks for your reply, d_s_k. The only reason I am swapping out this doorbell transformer which has powered my mechanical door chime without fail for almost 14 years is my project on installing a ring (brand name) video doorbell. The manufacturer has posted about 20 warnings on its website that most people in the US have a 10 VA transformer that will not power both the video doorbell and separate chime. The mandate is a 30 VA transformer must be in place for both components to work. This is what is driving my mission, and I am ready for action.
 
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Old 11-02-19, 03:16 PM
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PJmax

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Remove the panel cover. You will find the transformer comes with short wires which have been lengthened inside the panel. Trace the black wire to the associated breaker. Turn the breaker off. Remove the wirenuts on the white and black wires. Remove transformer. There may be a green wire that needs to be disconnected.

The transformer should be held in place with a single screw.
Thanks for your reply, Pete. I wanted to point out that my current transformer shown in my submitted photo, as well as the replacement transformer, look the same. What I have yet to see on the internet--even though I have read the electrical panel is currently the preferred location for placement of the doorbell transformer--is a photo or video that shows what I believe is a threaded cylinder on the transformer that is secured inside the panel. I will find out the arrangement myself in the next few days, but it would be great to see how a transformer of my shape and type is secured and connected inside the panel.

 
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Old 11-02-19, 05:36 PM
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Zorfdt

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Since you're new working in your panel, it's usually safest to turn off the main breaker. This will de-energize most of the panel, but you still need to steer clear of the main lugs at the top which will be live.

Always recommend wearing rubber-soled shoes, standing on a piece of plywood, and keeping one hand in your pocket whenever possible. After you do it a few times, you'll feel more comfortable - but you still need to be aware of what you're doing.
Thanks for the precautions, Zorfdt. I will utilize all of them, along with my multi-tester and current detector. Appreciate your input.
 
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Old 11-02-19, 10:00 PM
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This is the connection you are asking about and that I previously described.
Remove the lock nut.
Insert into hole in panel.
Place lock nut over wires and tighten onto transformer.
Make wire connections.

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Old 11-03-19, 01:09 PM
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No need to quote when replying.

Joed.... that may not be the transformer in use.The single screw type is much more popular.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 03:03 PM
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He asked about a "threaded cylinder on the transformer that is secured inside the panel". Trying to show what he might have.
 
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Old 11-04-19, 11:52 AM
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Hi joed,

Thanks for your reply. I am confident you hit the nail on the head regarding the configuration of my current and new transformer. I noted there are a number of probably punch-outs on the sides of the panel box, and the threaded portion is inserted and secured by the retaining ring.

Appreciate your taking the time to submit this photo. It is always comforting to have a rough idea of what to expect. Hoping for smooth sailing once the ring video pro arrives.
 
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