New main panel. No ground buss bar

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Old 11-02-19, 11:23 PM
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New main panel. No ground buss bar

Installing a 220V EV charger. Main panel is relatively new (~2-3 years). When I opened it, I found NO ground buss, but everything is bonded with an 8 or 6 gauge bare wire that goes out to a ground rod. Where do I connect my ground for the charger?

Furthermore, there are many circuits entering main panel. Not a single one has a ground wire. And there was an inspected add-on bathroom/laundry added about a year ago, and I can't figure out why there are no grounds for that either. It's perplexing. There are no other panels or sub-panels.

See pics.

Anyone?
 
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Old 11-03-19, 04:59 AM
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The ground bar is a the bottom of the picture. The neutral bar is at the top of the picture.Being a main panel they are both connected.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 05:07 AM
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Are all branch circuits without ground wires in rigid metal conduit and with metal outlet boxes? If so then the conduit is the equipment grounding conductor.

Hint: Your city might mandate metal conduit for branch circuits. Check the supplement to the NEC (if any) for your city, might be titled something like "Smallville Electric Code" and making reference to the NEC within..

If conduit is not required than you may add circuits using Romex type cable (NM with ground).

Flexible spiral metal conduit is an EGC only if a bare wire or metal strip runs the full length inside, outside any paper lining. This strip need not come into outlet boxes and be wire nutted to other ground wires. Thus you may have difficulty verifying the strips's presence.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 11-03-19 at 05:25 AM.
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Old 11-03-19, 05:15 AM
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The steel conduit is the ground. EMT, RMC, and IMC are listed to be used as an equipment ground when installed with approved fittings, boxes, and proper installation.

In the main panel, the neutral and grounds are connected together. This is the only place this is done.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 10:03 AM
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The ground bar is a the bottom of the picture. The neutral bar is at the top of the picture.Being a main panel they are both connected.

I notice that the service neutral and all branch circuit neutrals are on the ground bar. I know they are bonded together and to the panel box, but in my opinion all of those neutral conductors should be on the neutral bus.
 
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Old 11-03-19, 12:55 PM
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but in my opinion all of those neutral conductors should be on the neutral bus.
I would agree with that. I don't know if it is required by code.
 
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Old 11-04-19, 10:11 AM
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Thanks for the help. This panel is in a garage, and every circuit is in EMT. There is no romex to be found although I don't know what's behind walls as it travels to other parts of the house. So if I'm understanding, say there is a receptacle 10' away from the panel. It is connected with EMT. If I open that receptacle box, I should find the green ground wire bonded to the receptacle box and that's it?
 
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Old 11-04-19, 10:33 AM
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If I open that receptacle box, I should find the green ground wire bonded to the receptacle box and that's it?
You should find a green or bare grounding jumper connected from the green ground screw on the device attached to the metal box. Connection to the box can be by another green ground screw or sometimes a grounding clip. When you get into more expensive commercial devices you'll find that many of them are self grounding eliminating the need for the grounding jumper.
 
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Old 11-04-19, 10:37 AM
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I would agree with that. I don't know if it is required by code.

The NEC requires that the service neutral be terminated on the neutral bus and not bonded to it. I am pretty sure the branch neutrals are also required to be on the neutral bus although I cannot quote the paragraph in the code.

The same with the GEC, it must be terminated on the neutral bus and not just bonded to it.
 
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