Framing for 200A panel?

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Old 11-08-19, 02:18 PM
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Framing for 200A panel?

We are putting in a Siemens 200A panel on a wall that won't have any framing. It's a solid wood square that we'll probably put 2" of polystyrene insulation on and then the panel in front.
the electrician says he needs some sort of framing to attach whether a plywood on the polystyrene or studs around.
The dimensions seem to be 4" x 14.25" x 36"
Is that normal - I thought all panels were 3.5" to match the 2x4 stud?

Could I just make a wood frame square on the wall so he can attach?
 
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Old 11-08-19, 02:59 PM
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3 7/8" is a typical load center depth. so, you can get it flush with 3/8" drywall and 2x4" studs. Can't really follow what your wall is?
 
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Old 11-08-19, 04:06 PM
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It's like the wood in this picture, ignore the old panel.
If I'm not putting studs, how do I mount it? Polystyrene and plywood will kind of mess up the depths.
 
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Old 11-08-19, 06:16 PM
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The panel can surface mount to the wood surface. If you are planning to install polystyrene over the wood then you need a plywood base over the PS to mount the panel. You can not mount the panel direct to the PS.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 04:19 AM
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Polystyrene + plywood + panel = 6 3/4" wall?
if I instead put a 2x4 wall with wool, I guess you cant have insulation behind the panel?
If so how much space do you leave on the side studs for wires to come out?
 
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Old 11-09-19, 05:03 AM
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Bring the cables into the top or bottom of the panel. It gives you more room to work.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 06:20 AM
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In Canada the main breaker compartment is separate from the branch circuits. Branch circuits can not pass through this compartment. Depending on how you mount the panel you can only enter the top or the bottom not both.
Panels are also often mounted sideways.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 06:32 AM
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I could make an 18" wall or 24" and allow one side to be completely open.
doesn't this stop you from using all circuits or are there enough knockouts on just the top and one side?

Also, if the panel goes in in advance of the wall framing, can I just make a small area of 2x4s nailed into the wood square and not have the 2x4 go all the way to floor and ceiling?
 
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Old 11-09-19, 07:40 AM
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I am confused about what the issue is. You said you are not putting in studs. That means the panel will be surface mounted. You can come in from any side except the main breaker compartment.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 08:07 AM
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None of the side knockouts are used in a typical, flush mount, framed, install. Top/bottom is it.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 09:03 AM
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The OP said
I'm not putting studs, how do I mount it?
that means surface mount and access to all sides.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 11:30 AM
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Sorry. I guess I changed my mind when I saw that surface mount would be 6 3/4" rather than flush which is 4. It's a small room. An extra 2" loss would be alot.

As one poster said in Canada, you can only have top or bottom due to the main wires being separated/compartmentalized for safety.
Maybe a 24" OC stud wall is better to allow side access.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 02:38 PM
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If you are allowing side access then you are still surface mounting the panel and just boxing it in.
I don't understand the depth difference. It's the same panel. It just depends if you mount it through the sides to the studs or through the back to the wall.
 
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Old 11-09-19, 05:01 PM
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In the first method I wanted to put polystyrene and plywood behind it aging the 2 3/4"
my main question really is if not using a full length stud now, could I just toe nail in a 2' section of 2x4 and make a floating frame halfway up the wall, make it solid so the panel can attach to that... Then build the wall a couple months later? There's no subfloor at the moment to build a wall properly
I need a temporary electricity supply for renovation work
 
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Old 11-12-19, 11:36 AM
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If it's temporary, you can do almost anything you want as long as it's secure. Screw it directly into the wall boards if you want, or build a temporary stud wall (2 studs with a sill and top plate at the floor/ceiling). Then when you're finally ready to finish this room, have the meter pulled (disconnecting all power to the panel), and build a wall around it.

Another option would be to install an outdoor panel on the exterior of your house temporarily - with some GFI receptacles and such. Then install the real panel when you're ready. Depends how 'temporary' this installation is.
 
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Old 11-19-19, 07:45 PM
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If I screw the plywood on top of the 2" polystyrene what's the best screw to make it stable?
6" screw into the wood wall?
worried that if the styrofoam was to ever crack/break then the plywood might move
 
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Old 11-19-19, 08:03 PM
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2" sytrene + 3/4 plywood, = 3-1/2 screw should be more than enough.
 
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