Wall heater wiring

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Old 11-09-19, 08:35 AM
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Wall heater wiring

I was attempting to replace a baseboard heater (750watt) with a wall heater ( 1000/2000 watt). However when I went to disconnect the baseboard heater I noticed it was wired with 14/2 wire. My question is can I safely hook up the wall heater using the existing wire and setting the wall heater to draw only a 1000 watts during operation?
 
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Old 11-09-19, 03:01 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You can connect up to 1440 watts on a 120v 15A circuit.
You can connect up to 2880 watts on a 240v 15A circuit.
 
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Old 11-10-19, 06:10 AM
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I would also check to be sure of one thing.
What was the voltage of the old heater at 750w? What is the voltage setting of the new heater you will be setting at 1,000w? More than likely the 750w was a 120v. I would think that if the new heater can run at 1,000/2,000 then it can be converted to either 120v or 240v. Don't mean to confuse you here. The 1,000w setting is probably going to be a 120v. I say this because if you happen to decide to set it at 2,000w and the circuit is a 120v setup then it won't run properly. if you already knew this then fine. I just wanted to point it out to you. Is this heater on a circuit with anything else like another heater? If so I would check the total draw on the circuit. you don't want to be tripping the breaker adding the extra 300w to the circuit without knowing this.
 
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Old 11-10-19, 12:59 PM
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1,000/2,000 then it can be converted to either 120v or 240v
The wattage doesn't halve on a lower voltage.
A 2000w 240v heater running on 120v is 500w.
 
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Old 11-12-19, 11:31 AM
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A 2000w 240v heater running on 120v is 500w.
Pete - I think you may have mis-typed.

Wattage for resistive (most) loads remains the same regardless of the voltage.
1000w heater on 120v is 1000w
1000w heater on 240v is 1000w

Difference is amperage (and subsequently wire size).
That same 1000w heater on a 120v circuit is 8.3A. Can only run one on a 15A (14ga) circuit/wire.
Up it to 240v is 4.1A, you could run 3 heaters on one 15A (14ga) circuit/wire
 
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Old 11-12-19, 09:40 PM
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I didn't mistype. Halving the voltage will quarter the power. Look it up.
 
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Old 11-13-19, 06:34 AM
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Wattage for resistive (most) loads remains the same regardless of the voltage.
1000w heater on 120v is 1000w
1000w heater on 240v is 1000w
No it doesn't. The resistance of the heater remains the same. Calculate the resistance of 240 volt 1000 watt heater and use that resistance to calculate the wattage at 120 volts.
 
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Old 11-13-19, 10:13 AM
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I am with Pjmax

Hopefully the below makes sense.
Assume a circuit with 100 volts, 100 ohm load, therefor current is 1 amp.

Power = V X I = 100 X 1 = 100 watts
Also power can be figured out by voltage squared divided by resistance = (100 X 100) / 100 = 10000 / 100 = 100 watts.
Half the voltage and it becomes = (50 X 50) / 100= 2500 / 100= 25 watts

Now to double check it. 50 volts with a 100 ohm load is 0.5 amps
Power = V X I = 50 X 0.5= 25 watts
 
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Old 11-13-19, 10:45 AM
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I stand corrected!

I was looking at it as buying a 1000w @ 120v heater or a 1000w @ 240w heater... same wattage and same heat, but lower amperage. But that was definitely not what the OP was talking about nor the discussion.

Ohms law gets me again!
 
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