electrical drops from ceiling that meet fire code

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Old 11-15-19, 09:29 AM
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electrical drops from ceiling that meet fire code

Hi ya'll,

I have a commercial application here where we have electrical cords that are hanging from the ceiling that have a power strip on the end. According to the fire marshal this doesn't meet code and we need an electrical drop. Anybody here know what that is even. My guess is this electrical drop would have to somehow connect on the outlet box on the ceiling and have flexible conduit running from it with a receptacle on the end. Have never seen anything like that before though. So am not sure what he wants me to do.

Thanks,
-Mike
 
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Old 11-15-19, 09:35 AM
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I have a commercial application here where we have electrical cords that are hanging from the ceiling that have a power strip on the end. According to the fire marshal this doesn't meet code and we need an electrical drop.

First thing I would ask the Fire Marshal is what code does this not meet, the NEC or the local fire codes? And then, what specific section and paragraph of that code. Cord drops are perfectly acceptable to machines or benches in a commercial/industrial setting, but they must be installed correctly.
 
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Old 11-15-19, 09:51 AM
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So how about using this for the conduit:


This to connect the conduit to the outlet boxes:


And finally this as the end electrical box:




The end electrical box will not be secured to anything but will just be dangling there. Not sure what is best to use for that.
 
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Old 11-15-19, 09:57 AM
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according to the report 2015 IFC 605.5 was the concern... Is what I am considering correct? Any better way? Thanks
 
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Old 11-15-19, 01:15 PM
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You probably need strain relief at both ends of the cord. You would also need to meet the conditions that allow flexible cord usage.
 
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Old 11-15-19, 01:22 PM
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It appears he believes these to be extension cords.

https://www.campusfiresafety.org/Por...-25-000000-000

605.5 Extension cords. Extension cords and flexible cords shall not be a substitute for permanent wiring. Extension cords and flexible cords shall not be affixed to structures,extended through walls, ceilings or floors, or under doors or floor coverings, nor shall such cords be subject to environmental damage or physical impact. Extension cords shall be used only with portable appliances.
 
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Old 11-16-19, 04:53 AM
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Ceiling type

What type of ceiling do you have? cords canít be used above them, post some pics of what you have, you could install a junction box on the ceiling and then drop the cord down from that using strain relief connectors on both ends and a Sky tie to support the cord at the top.
https://www.galco.com/buy/Adalet/SH-50
Geo
 
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Old 11-16-19, 12:58 PM
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I have installed hundreds of cord drops for machines, equipment, or for general purpose use using SO or SJO cord and boxes and receptacles on the end.

The cord must be properly supported, and may not pass through a wall or ceiling. If portability is required you could install a twist lock receptacle at the ceiling but otherwise hardwiring them is the best option.
 
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Old 11-18-19, 11:23 AM
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SO if I was to use the SJO cord I assume I use this at one electrical box to secure the SJO cord:




And then on the end I install something like this:



This is what it looks right now:
 
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Old 11-18-19, 12:45 PM
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My factory here has on the order of a hundred SO drops. The key is NOT to have a male plug on the end; too much like an extension cord that is in "permanent use".
 
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Old 11-18-19, 01:41 PM
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I would say you for sure would need some sort of cable restraint on those cords. They can't just hang by the plugs.
 
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Old 11-18-19, 03:05 PM
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Old 11-18-19, 05:56 PM
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Use a 1900 box (4"x4") cover with a KO in it and attach a strain relief connector like Geo posted. With most SO cord you will need a 3/4" and 1/2" for SJO cord.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 10:19 AM
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Ok so the installation would look like this.

On the electrical box on the ceiling I knockout one of the holes and then install what Geo posted in the knockout:
https://www.elecdirect.com/cable-mes...43-cable-range

I install the 1/2" SJO cord in the knockout with the strain relief connector and make the electrical connections in that electrical box on the ceiling.

Finally on the end I install a 1900 box with one of the knockouts out. I will then install probably two receptacles in the 1900 box and put on a metal cover. This 1900 box will be located on the ground; so this is how I extended the electrical supply from the ceiling to the ground.

A final question is do you think it is a good idea to use a twist lock electrical connection on the ceiling for strain relief? This has the benefit of increased portability as mentioned.
 
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Old 11-20-19, 06:56 PM
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I believe the bottom box must have a threaded hub. A stamped 1900 box is not listed for the use described and the knockout could be pushed in and create a shock hazard.
 
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Old 11-21-19, 04:44 AM
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Hi, the ceiling box would have a splice, no need for plug, also cord should have a strain relief connector on both ends.
Is this on a suspended ceiling?
Geo
 
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Old 11-21-19, 11:29 AM
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Nope, it isn't a suspended ceiling... Yeah I was going to do the splice on the ceiling box granted that it is smarter to hard wire it in versus using a twist lock up there.

Hello pcboss, what kind of threaded box were you considering?
 
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Old 11-21-19, 04:19 PM
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Hi, we have always used 4Ē Sq and never had an issue with knock outs being pushed in, although I suppose it could happen.
Geo
 
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