No framing members, code?

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  #1  
Old 11-25-19, 06:00 PM
Q
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No framing members, code?

I am bringing a few wires up through the floor on the right and attaching to the stud you see on the back corner. That will actually be a 2x4 stud wall but it's not made yet. The wires will then travel left across the styrofoam to the panel.
I'm just glueing the drywall directly onto the foam to save space so there won't be any framing members. The drywall screws go into a solid wood wall behind the foam.
What is the code here on framing members and is it ok to just run the wires across the foam in this example?
Panel https://imgur.com/gallery/MufwfsX

I guess I could make furring strips to create a small gap?
 

Last edited by qwertyjjj; 11-25-19 at 06:38 PM.
  #2  
Old 11-25-19, 07:15 PM
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You still need to support the cables somehow every 4'6". The cables also need to be protected somehow from any damage. How you do this is up to you.

This is why I tell people it is not worth using furring strips or directly attaching the drywall. The square inches you save is not worth the headache. Just build a stud wall to make your life easier.
 
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Old 11-25-19, 07:17 PM
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They'll be supported immediately on the plywood. It's 16" from side wall stud to the panel. So, support shouldn't be an issue.
i didn't think they needed to be protected directly behind drywall? If there's no framing member there then technically there's nothing to nail or screw into.
a drywall lug maybe but who would do that right next to a panel

It's a small room. I'm losing 4" on one side don't want to lose the same on the window side.
Agreed is not much of a difference at 2" foam + 3/4 furring but I do get full wall insulation coverage this way.
 
  #4  
Old 11-26-19, 06:32 AM
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Is the side you are losing 4" on a load bearing wall or an exterior wall? If not, can you use 2x3 studding instead of 2x4 so you have more room to work with on the windows side for insulation?

Ideally the wiring in the wall should be at least 1-3/4" (for 2x4 studs, in the middle plus 1/2" drywall) back from the wall surface and if the wiring is on the back side of the foam, perhaps against the foundation, that works well for an exterior basement wall.
 
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Old 11-26-19, 07:55 AM
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It's an exterior wall.
The insulation is already in place behind the panel so that's 2" gone already.
Don't really want to put an extra 2x3 in front.
I thought the coffee requirement was from framing members not drywall as such?
i could add a metal plate on the back of the drywall if really necessary but I thought there was also a distance from the panel that was usually allowed without nail/screw protection?
 
  #6  
Old 11-26-19, 07:18 PM
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To be exact, the cable needs to be fastened at least 1-1/4 inch back from the edge of the stud or joist, etc. closest to the wall surface.

The cable exiting the panel box or outlet box needs to be fastened to a stud, furring strip, etc. within 8 inches (within 12 inches if there is a clamp at the box opening). Within that distance the cable should be shaped, subject to minimum bend radii (radiuses) to best position it at said 1-1/4 inch setback although there is no means specified to make sure it stays that way until it reaches the first fastener.

With a nail resisting metal plate between the cable and the wall surface, no minimum setback is needed.
 
  #7  
Old 12-03-19, 07:05 PM
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If it were me, I would protect the wires while they are hidden behind the drywall. A bent piece of sheet metal as a large nailing plate, or maybe one of those binding plates used for structural supports. Basically something to prevent an errant nail/screw through the drywall.

There's some disagreement in the code afaik about how the 1.25" setback works in furred walls and is interpreted differently by different AJHs. But in the end, I don't want a screw through my nice new wires, so I tend to make sure that someone (including me) can't do something stupid.
 
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Old 12-03-19, 08:05 PM
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Here is one interpretation.
https://images.app.goo.gl/FrpNkoQnnCM5iaJPA
 
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Old 12-04-19, 06:10 AM
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In the aforementioned diagram the cable is shown fastened to the concrete wall behind the studding and a pair of arrowheads near the top left suggests that the cable may not be run against or attached to the stud. That does not make sense. In another part of the image the cable is shown attached to a stud.

IMHO (a lot of electricians do it and also it is shown on the left of the aforementioned diagram) for framing against a foundation wall or additional framing against a pre-existing wall more than 1-3/4 inches thick, the 1-1/4 inch clearance does not apply between the wiring and the wall "in back.".
 
 

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