No AC in Two Bedrooms

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  #1  
Old 01-02-20, 11:33 AM
K
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No AC in Two Bedrooms

We lost AC power to two bedrooms next to each other. The fuse box was never tripped, I reset the fuse for that zone but no luck. There is no GFCI for the two bedrooms that I could find. Everything else in the house works fine. A week latter and still not working I ended up turning the main fuse box to the house off and opened every duplex ac box and light switches for the two bedrooms, inspected the wires and everything looks fine. After closing everything an hour latter, I turned the main ac switch back on, the electricity was back and working fine without making any changes. Now two weeks latter and the same problem again! Any clues to what could be causing the problem? When the problem happened the room light flickered before going out but the weather was damp, but no rain or storms.
 
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Old 01-02-20, 03:47 PM
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You have a loose connection on the same circuit as the dead receptacles. The problem could be in a good working device. If any of the devices use the back stab pushin connections move them to the screws. Back stabs are a very common source of this problem.
 
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Old 01-02-20, 08:29 PM
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Thanks Joe for the Tip. I did a continuity test on all the plugs and everything was fine but did not check for back stab connections . I will check it out and let you know.
 
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Old 01-02-20, 11:20 PM
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Sometimes if the connection is bad you can tap on the receptacle and make the power go on and off.
 
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Old 01-03-20, 01:14 PM
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So after taking out all the outlets in the first room nothing. Moved on to the second room which has five outlets and it ended up being the fourth plug. One connection looked loose, when I discounted the outlet the screw connection was tight but the wire was not seated properly and notice some burns/melting. I was relieved as I new this has to be the problem. After putting in a new outlet everything works fine. The house is twenty years old and can not imagine it lasted that long being seated incorrectly. We did have a lot of thunderstorms 6 months ago and wondering if the wire got unseated from a surge. See photo below for damaged outlet.

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Old 01-03-20, 05:19 PM
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A loose connection often will not show up for long time, especially if no large loads are used on the circuit.
Each time you use it it heat up little bit. Every heat cycle causes expansion and contraction. Over much time the connection gets looser and the heating gets worse until you get what you found.
 
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Old 01-03-20, 06:22 PM
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We did have a lot of thunderstorms 6 months ago and wondering if the wire got unseated from a surge.
That would be rare, extremely rare. A surge is just a momentary high voltage.
 
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Old 01-03-20, 09:28 PM
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It was working fine until recently, this is a 20 years old outlet. Do you think the build material can withstand that stress this long if it was mounted incorrectly? Could something else caused the wire to shift from position with the screw being tight? Again the screw was tight with a gap on the left side of the connection. So the wire was seated on the right side while the left is shifted up with the tip of the wire touching the plastic. The insulation on the wire on the right side was also partially burned.
 
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Old 01-04-20, 07:17 AM
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As Joed mentioned, it's somewhat common for connections to loosen over years or decades. That one screw was probably tightened a bit less than the others, and years and years of expanding and contracting caused it to loosen. I've seen it happen with screw terminals as well as poorly twisted wire nuts, sometimes seemingly after 10-20 years.
That's why electrical systems are built the way they are, with larger wire sizes, all connections in metal boxes, etc. all to improve safety. If that receptacle was screwed into the drywall with insulation behind it and no box (like some DIYers not on this site do), you can see how it could become a hazard. It's why electrical codes exist!
 
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Old 01-05-20, 08:16 AM
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Adhering to codes is very important to insure safety.
 
 

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