Portable 120v OVER 1500 watt commercial heaters

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-08-20, 08:57 AM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 243
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Portable 120v OVER 1500 watt commercial heaters

I realized residential/consumer heaters are limited to 1500 watts (for 15 amp circuits) which appears in reality more like 1350w measured from 2 such heaters.

I'm looking for a commercial heater 120 volts that is greater than 1500 watts. As in for a 20 amp circuit. Not something that hangs on a wall, but portable. The commercial searches I have done only bring up 240v models or 1500w 120v ones. Does anyone make one for a 20amp 120v line?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-08-20, 10:09 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 55,153
Received 589 Votes on 554 Posts
It would be too much of a limited application heater. It would require a 120v 20A receptacle. When you switch to commercial heaters.... the next step up is 3kw which requires a 120v 25A+.

Did find this one....... 1800 watt 120v
 
  #3  
Old 02-08-20, 10:23 AM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 243
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Thanks, but that is a wall heater, also, the price makes it out of the question.

A littler further research tells me that heater current ratings have to be de-rated 20% due to being considered 'continuous' in operation for the circuit. Just about all of the cheap heaters are labeled for 1500 watts when they actually aren't.
 
  #4  
Old 02-17-20, 01:40 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Southern Arizona
Posts: 67
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
This is diving outside the lines, Dewalt makes a propane heater, 70K that works from their 20v batteries.
https://www.dewalt.com/product-repos...6/22/dxh70cfav

I found this.
https://www.amazon.com/DULPLAY-Adjus...07JNLLRR7?th=1
No where does it say UL listed!

Side note when I worked at the Copper Mine in New Mexico we had portable electric heaters that were fused at 40 amps at 480v 3 phase. In the mechanical areas they scared me because of the melting water and the amount of power. More than 5 feet way and they did very little. We were at 7300 feet and it got cold and wind in the winter months. It was not uncommon to see 3 or 4 of them arranged around a D10 Cat when they were working on it. similar to
https://sites.google.com/site/tophea...phase-fhk6483a
 
  #5  
Old 02-17-20, 02:22 AM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 243
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
That 1800 watt heater sells direct from China and it over 3x the price of that type of heater. It didn't surprise me that there wasn't a UL rating.

Anyway, from further research, it's now apparent the 1500 watt limit which I first though was just a 'consumer/residential' limit requirement apply s across the board to all 120v heaters including commercial.

I further found that the newer 'ceramic' element heaters are (supposedly) more efficient that the old school 'coil' versions.
At least two that seem to be decent for less than $40 that actually measure in the 1500 watt range. They are smaller than the coil versions (not a issue here), but the tip-over 'protection' is overly sensitive. Tip it 1 degree, they shut off by a pressure switch on the bottom as opposed to a internal level switch which had far more leeway.
Comparing (just by feel) the hot air from the coil & the ceramic, the ceramics did 'throw' more heat. Again its 1500 vs 1350 watts.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Interestingly, both of these shared the same protection circuit board design based on the operation (tip-over and over temperature). The power up delay of 30 seconds from off to full output was the same also ( I figure to protect the ceramic element, 'pre-heat'). The 2nd one was even smaller and the stiffer cord kept causing the enclosure to 'lift up', tripping the protection. That will be sent back.


 
  #6  
Old 02-17-20, 08:33 AM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 3,811
Received 44 Votes on 42 Posts
The official maximum wattage of a heater (or other device) for a 15 amp 120 volt circuit is 1440.

If the heat transfer to the air is less efficient, say with a built in multi-speed fan set to low then the heating element temperature will rise a bit and the element resistance will increase a bit and the current draw (watts) will decrease a bit. Conversely if the heat transfer to the air is more efficient, for example with a multi speed fan set to high or a large (perhaps ceramic) heat sink, the element temperature will drop a bit, the resistance will drop a bit, and the current draw will increase a bit.

Other factors affecting how warm each heater feels is the reflectivity of (including how well polished is) the back inner lining of the heater and the spread of the air flow from the built in fan.

A better proof of whether the ceramic heater is giving more heat is to get a Kill A Watt tester and compare the watts drawn by this ceramic heater versus the other heater being used. A clamp on ammeter would also give good numbers to go by provided that for a difference in draw of one amp did not result in a supply voltage difference, say due to voltage drop, of more than one volt.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 02-17-20 at 09:02 AM.
  #7  
Old 02-17-20, 12:35 PM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 243
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
A better proof of whether the ceramic heater is giving more heat is to get a Kill A Watt tester and compare the watts drawn by this ceramic heater versus the other heater being used.
Which I have (and 2 others) and which I already did, hence the 1350 figure I stated.
Actually the older Kill-A-watt is dated and has it's flaws compared to the others available.
 
  #8  
Old 02-17-20, 03:26 PM
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Trumbull, CT, USA
Posts: 425
Received 6 Votes on 6 Posts
This is like hair dryer makers saying that they are selling a 1875 Watt hairdryer where as most only draw 1350Watts @ 120V. I have a "1500 Watt" heat-gun that I got at Harbor Freight and that also only draws about 1250W (on high) @ about 117 Volts measured with a digital multi-meter (for the voltage) and a clamp-on amp meter (for the amperage & wattage).

I once fixed an old 1960's space heater for a friend (the fan motor needed oiling and I also cleaned out the dust while I was in there) that was rated at 1600Watts max and on high it really warmed up the room quick with its scary looking glowing heater wires.
 
  #9  
Old 02-17-20, 06:15 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,123
Received 88 Votes on 79 Posts
If you need a bigger heater just buy two. 2700 watts total. Of course you will need two separate circuits to run them. 😉
 
  #10  
Old 02-18-20, 02:09 AM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: United States
Posts: 243
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
This is like hair dryer makers saying that they are selling a 1875 Watt hairdryer where as most only draw 1350Watts @ 120V.
Typical corporate America (or should I say China) lying about everything for marketing purposes.
If you need a bigger heater just buy two. 2700 watts total.
If I needed that much, I would of run a gas line and installed a natural gas wall heater. This single 1500 (actual) watt unit seems to be fine for the purpose;
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


The meters I was talking about (other than the older Kill-A-Watt's that I've had for 15+ years) are these;
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

and this a few years ago (but at a lower price);
https://www.amazon.com/uxcell-TS-838...4&sr=8-1-fkmr0
 

Last edited by videobruce; 02-18-20 at 02:33 AM. Reason: added links
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: