How far can I run 14/2 wire?

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  #1  
Old 02-09-20, 09:18 AM
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How far can I run 14/2 wire?

I am currently wiring some lights in my garage. I have a 15 amp breaker with 14/2 wire traveling a total of 210 ft with 11 fixtures in between that draw a combined total amperage of 2.6 amps. Is this ok? If not or if there's even any question I can shorten the wiring. Please chime in. Thanks.
 
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Old 02-09-20, 09:46 AM
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The 14/2 cable here will support the 2.6 amperes total draw over the 210 feet with no problem.

It gets tricky, requiring math, when you are dealing with higher current draw.

For those eavesdropping, using more cable for a branch routing with junction boxes and where the maximum running distance from the panel to any given outlet is less will be superior to using less cable for a sinuous daisy chain structure where the running distance from the panel to the last outlet ends up being greater.
 
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Old 02-09-20, 10:04 AM
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Why not run two different circuits for two different reasons.
#1, If the break trips you'll still have lights if both are one.
#2, Sometimes you only need lights in the area you'll be working so why waste elect. ?
 
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Old 02-09-20, 10:28 AM
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I would run two circuits or alternatively upgrade to 12 ga wire. While the voltage drop is not significant for a 2.6A load you are running a 15A circuit and with higher current loads (want to use a power tool?) the voltage drop becomes a factor over such a long run.
 
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Old 02-09-20, 12:29 PM
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I must be missing something. The OP is only asking about a lighting circuit and he is getting advice about having 2 circuits and using #12 because of the possibility of using power tools. ????
 
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Old 02-09-20, 12:55 PM
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... possibility of using power tools ...
Called futureproofing. The OP could but did not choose to get out a crystal ball and/or a copper wire resistance calculator (yet).

Without futureproofing you don't need two branch circuits. One with switch boxes in strategic places can allow for controlling the lights in two or more zones.
 
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Old 02-09-20, 01:42 PM
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What happens when the next owner sees a 15A circuit as a 15A circuit and decides to add a receptacle for added power? At 15 amps load the line loss is nearly 15%.
 
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Old 02-09-20, 04:20 PM
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There are 10 A breakers out there. The QO series for instance.

You could have the same argument if one sees #10 wire on a 15A breaker, also 200 ft long. They could try to put a water heater on that line. This is beyond the scope of the install, and is incumbent on the person doing future mods to understand the consequences of long runs.
 
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Old 02-09-20, 06:17 PM
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It is not on the current owner to meet the needs of any possible future owner.

A 15 amp circuit for those lights is plenty.
 
CasualJoe voted this post useful.
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Old 02-09-20, 06:48 PM
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My point is alot of advice without knowing enough details. For one is the garage attached or detached? Shouldn't assume detached because of the 200ft of circuit run.
 
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Old 02-10-20, 05:45 AM
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... without knowing enough details ...
You mean that the first person to reply to a thread should (almost) always answer the OP's question with a question?

Incidentally, in this case, no one had assumed it was a detached garage.

 
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Old 02-10-20, 07:02 AM
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You mean that the first person to reply to a thread should (almost) always answer the OP's question with a question?
I didn't say that. But sometimes additional information is needed to understand the situation before meaningful advice can be given.

Incidentally, in this case, no one had assumed it was a detached garage.
Didn't say anyone did. But it is cool that you are a mind reader.


 
 

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