Help with Electrical Outlets in Cabinet

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Old 02-11-20, 09:24 AM
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Help with Electrical Outlets in Cabinet

Hello. I need some help in getting some electrical outlets in a cabinet in the wall I'm building. Any suggestions on how to go about doing this? I'd like to have at least 4 outlets inside the cabinet, drawn in red in my diagram. There is a light switch to the right, and an electrical outlet to the left of the cabinet separated by two studs. Wall is not load bearing. I have very basic electrical knowledge (i.e. installing a new electrical outlet from an existing outlet). Any ideas? Thanks!

Ideally, something like this.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...IFN3E002&psc=1
 
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Old 02-11-20, 09:39 AM
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That device, being cord connected, is not designed for permanent in-wall use.

There are a number of USB charging capable wall receptacles, I use and would suggest.
 
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Old 02-11-20, 09:50 AM
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Sorry, I actually didn't need the USB portion of it. It was just an example of the flushed look I wanted with the outlets.

I'm thinking I will need to draw power from either that light switch or that electrical outlet on the left? But I still don't know what type of 4 linear outlet receptacle I can use that's meant for permanent use.
 
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Old 02-11-20, 10:01 AM
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Why can't you just put in a double gang box with 2 receptacles? (4 outlets) Cut out the back of the cabinet for the double gang box, and after the cabinet is installed, put your cover on.
 
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Old 02-11-20, 10:11 AM
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So the cabinet itself is only 4 inches in depth. The fiance wanted a really large medicine cabinet. Behind that cabinet is our bedroom, so we don't want anything behind it. So I'd like to mount these receptacles vertically, from the left side, like in that drawing. But then I face the obstacles of those studs. There's probably a simple way I'm missing, just not very experienced in this. Thanks.
 
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Old 02-11-20, 11:29 AM
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Old 02-11-20, 06:15 PM
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What is your location?
In Canada the receptacles would be required to turn off automatically when the door is shut via a door switch of some sort.
If it is open shelf no issues. You can't have receptacles in a cabinet behind closed doors.
 
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Old 02-12-20, 04:14 AM
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Just Google "hard wired power strip". look at several of the links that come up.

I know it is none of my business but why do you need 4 outlets?
There are a couple concerns.
If in a bathroom you may need it to be GFI protected.
What is the current draw as it may overload the line you tap into.
Also you have to move that switch. You cannot have a hidden junction box in a wall so moving it may be a problem.
 
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Old 02-12-20, 08:55 AM
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Thanks for the replies. I'm in the US.

The cabinet's door will be a giant floor mirror that's attached via slides that will open to the left. I've attached two beam lights, one to the left, and one to the right of the mirror, accounting for two of the outlets. The other 2 outlets are for hair dryers, curling ions, etc. Only one of those would be used at one time. The 4th plug is for a rechargeable toothbrush.

The bathroom's circuit is GFI protected. I'm not sure what the current draw is.

I wasn't really sure what to do about that switch. My fiance just said to leave it inside the medicine cabinet, which I thought was okay since it was still accessible without having to demo/remove the wall.
 
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Old 02-12-20, 10:38 AM
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You can't have receptacles in a cabinet behind closed doors.
If that was true in the US, we couldn't wire our garbage disposals (outlet in sink base) or built in microwaves (Outlet in wall cabinet).
 
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Old 02-12-20, 11:38 AM
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Hidden may have been the wrong term non-accessible would have been better.

I can not see how much or where the wires go up through the ceiling.
He has two wires looks like one goes to the left and I cannot tell where the other one goes.
So if he wanted to move the switch over by the outlet to the left and he does not have enough wire he cannot put a junction box in the wall and then drywall over it.
If he wanted to he could put a junction box opening into the new cabinet and then put a cover on that.

Having a switch inside a cabinet just seems strange to me but then I am not designing it.
 
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Old 02-12-20, 12:18 PM
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If that was true in the US, we couldn't wire our garbage disposals (outlet in sink base) or built in microwaves (Outlet in wall cabinet).
Those are some of the exceptions to the rule which also includes dishwashers, range hoods, inline heaters.
 
 

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