Ampere Interrupting Capacity stick on label

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Old 02-23-20, 01:32 PM
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Ampere Interrupting Capacity stick on label

I'm doing my own electrical on a new pole building. I had to get the basic inspection to get the pole installed. The inspector from L&I said I needed an Ampere Interrupting Capacity sticker/ label on the front of my breaker box saying AIC AMPS______ DATE_____.......I got the Amps from my local PUD Electric Co after they installed the pole. Can someone tell me where I can get the Label for this ?????
 
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Old 02-23-20, 02:07 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

That sticker should be on the panel.
It comes from the manufacturer as it's a panel design parameter.
Breakers usually have it listed on them too.
 
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Old 02-23-20, 05:04 PM
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Hi Pete, nothing on the outside panel cover. Is there a place to order a a sticker ??????
 
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Old 02-23-20, 05:15 PM
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Not that I know of. What's the make and model of that panel ?

Did you pull the cover and look inside ?
 
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Old 02-23-20, 05:24 PM
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I got the Amps from my local PUD Electric Co after they installed the pole. Can someone tell me where I can get the Label for this ?????
I believe I recently read something on this, but cannot remember where? I believe the label you are referring to is something you can make yourself or that you can write the interrupting capacity on the outside of the disconnect or panel.
 

Last edited by CasualJoe; 02-23-20 at 05:41 PM.
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Old 02-23-20, 05:45 PM
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I still don't remember where I read it, but found more information on the fault current labeling requirement that is rarely enforced.

First, ensure that the maximum fault current is printed and displayed on your service disconnect. The fault current or amps interrupting capacity (AIC) rating denotes the maximum fault the breaker can interrupt without self destructing. The utility will look at the incoming potential on the primary, and then calculate what the potential is on the secondary side of its transformer. It will then publish a number that represents the maximum fault current the service should ever be able to see, and the breaker needs to be sized accordingly. Per NEC 110.24(A), this shall be field marked on the equipment (Photo 1). This particular label is not often seen on the required service equipment, because it is one of those regulations that is not commonly enforced. In addition, the service disconnect must also be labeled as the “Service Disconnect,” per NEC 230.70(B).
8th paragraph here:

https://www.ecmweb.com/safety/articl...ng-part-1-of-2
 
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Old 02-23-20, 06:23 PM
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The calculation is pretty easy. Contact the power company and they will either give you the fault current or the impedance of the transformer. Then download an app to do the calculation for you.
 
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Old 02-23-20, 06:28 PM
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He needs to find the rating for his panel/disconnect first...... correct ?
It needs to be higher in current interruption ampacity from what the power company is supplying.
He already has the info from his Poco.
 
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Old 02-23-20, 06:45 PM
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I called my power company and the gave me the 3109 Amps number. So, what the inspector is looking for is
a sticker saying this

AIC 3109 Amps
Date 02-13-2020
 
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Old 02-24-20, 05:50 AM
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I use this one to make breaker labels, etc:
About $30

 
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Old 02-24-20, 09:48 AM
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He needs to find the rating for his panel/disconnect first...... correct ?
It needs to be higher in current interruption ampacity from what the power company is supplying.
I would agree and that can be found on the label inside the disconnect or panel. I also don't think I have ever seen a loadcenter that was anything but 10,000 AIC rated. I only remember one time that a power company cautioned me to the fact that fault current required 22,000 AIC equipment.
 
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Old 02-24-20, 10:11 AM
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Having just researched this for myself. Square D and Leviton furnish standard 22k AIC for mains breakers, and 10k for branch and feeder breakers. I was concerned since my new panel was only 30 feet from a 75kVA pole transformer. Neither the POCO or the inspector seemed to worry with this.
 
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Old 02-24-20, 02:19 PM
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I just talked with the L&I Insp. He said the ID Plate has to be made by some like a trophy shop that does engraving. The plate has to be Phenolic plastic or metal with contrasting colors with letters being 1/4". Thats the story. Thanks to all who answered my question.......Bill
 
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Old 02-24-20, 03:38 PM
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I recently replaced a small service downtown in a parking lot that fed a small pay booth. Inspecter required me to label the panel with the available fault current. I called the power company and they told me the available fault current was 200,000 amps! Mind you this is a small single-phase meter/panel and there was no way this panel would handle that kind of current. All I did was print a label on a label maker like Telecom guy posted and dated it with a marker. Inspector was happy with that. Go figure.
 
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Old 02-25-20, 05:24 PM
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I just talked with the L&I Insp. He said the ID Plate has to be made by some like a trophy shop that does engraving. The plate has to be Phenolic plastic or metal with contrasting colors with letters being 1/4".
That isn't a code requirement, but considering this is what your inspector wanted to see, best to pacify him and give him what he wants since it isn't totally out of the question. Any signage shop, such as that makes office or building signage, can make those plastic engraved signs. I once went a step further and labelled every switch and transformer in a small substation and even had the signage color coded for voltage.
 
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