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Rough in for Electric Car Charge and Electric Water Heater

Rough in for Electric Car Charge and Electric Water Heater

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Old 03-04-20, 10:16 AM
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Rough in for Electric Car Charge and Electric Water Heater

I live in a one story house withe a bunker garage (so the garage is 3/4 below grade. Right now I've got my first floor bathroom walls opened up to do a remodel and the bathroom lies above the garage. I want to rough in the wiring from the garage up to the attic while the wall is open so that it'll be easier in the future to run the electric for both a car charger and a heat pump water heater. I only want to rough it in because getting to my electrical panel (at the other end of the house) is going to require more holes so I was going to do that when I open up some walls down on that end of the house. So I am thinking to run an 8/3 for the water heater and a 6/3 for the car. I know those are both one size up from what I need, but I like oversizing.

So my questions for you all is should I actually rough in the wire now or should I just run and EMT or some other conduit and cap it on the ends and just run the wires through it at a later time. I'm leaning towards the conduit but wanted to hear what you all thought and if you think I am forgetting anything.

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-04-20, 10:32 AM
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I would just run conduit for now. Till you actually select and purchase the water heater and charger you won't know the exact electrical requirements so a conduit will keep your options open. If you decide to rough in cables, why 8-3 and 6-3? What are the voltages? 240 volts or 120/240 volts?
 
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Old 03-04-20, 10:42 AM
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Both would be 240v. A 30A service for the hot water and 50A for the car.
 
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Old 03-04-20, 11:06 AM
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I agree with Joe. I'd run a 1.25 PVC conduit from the attic to the garage wall. Terminate it in the garage in a large box and cover it. Seal it in the attic for now.

I wouldn't bother spending the money on wire until you actually know what you want/need. The conduit will work nicely as either a sleeve or a conduit system for when you need it. My experience has been whenever I've added extra cables for future use, they end up collecting dust and rarely if ever get used. Conduit is a much more cost-effective method.

Also, for what it's worth, I don't like oversizing wires either. I've learned that the $10-$50 that's spent on oversizing could be spent on much better items that are actually useful. Just my $0.02.
 
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Old 03-04-20, 11:13 AM
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So a couple follow up questions.....

1) why pvc instead of EMT?
2) do I have to put a box in the basement now? The end of the conduit will be behind the ceiling drywall down there.
3) does the conduit have to be secured to the studs in the wall cavity or can it “float” if I secure it top and bottom?
4) can I bury a fitting in the wall? This would allow me to do most of the work not in the attic or basement.

thanks!!
 
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Old 03-04-20, 06:13 PM
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PVC or EMT..... a matter of personal preference. When I wire new homes I use EMT.
I usually put a box on both ends when installed. Inspectors won't allow a large open pipe in the wall.
You can have fittings in the wall.
The pipe should be fastened at both ends or at the very least..... the top so that it can't slip down.
 
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Old 03-05-20, 12:12 AM
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Thanks!! Since the bottom end of this is going to be behind the ceiling drywall do I really need to install a box and then cap? Since it’s in the garage I probably have to worry about making sure the box is sealed appropriately. And recommendations on boxes to use on old work that’ll accept a 1.5” conduit?
 
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Old 03-05-20, 11:42 AM
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EMT is more difficult to work with (notably getting bends accurate) compared with PVC and that may cause some folks to choose Romex instead of conduit for better or worse.
 
 

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