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Converting bathroom light switch to a light/fan switch... is my wiring correct?

Converting bathroom light switch to a light/fan switch... is my wiring correct?

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  #1  
Old 03-10-20, 02:11 AM
T
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Converting bathroom light switch to a light/fan switch... is my wiring correct?

Bathroom just has a light on a single switch, and I am installing a fan/light, and want the fan and light to have separate switches. The thing that has me confused is that the line feed doesnt go into the switch box, it goes into a junction box in the attic, and the switch wires run up to it. So I'm trying to figure out how to get a hot line down to the switch, and still make all other connections, using just the new 3 wire romex I ran.

This is the best I could come up with, which uses a separate 2 wire romex in the attic, to connect the light/fan neutrals to the house neutral in the junction box. Will this work, or do I need to run additional lines down to the switch, or something?



https://i.imgur.com/byMULSj.png
 

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03-10-20, 05:44 AM
lambition
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You cannot do that. Feed and return from the switch must be in a single cable or conduit. (Either 2 hots entering and leaving the switch or hot and neutral.)

The original wiring probably had switched hot going back to the junction box in the attic and the fan is wired from it. Isn't it?

You have 2 options.

Run 14-3 from the switch to junction box in the attic, then back to the fan.
or
Run 14-2 from the junction box in the attic to the switch (which probably is already there..), then run 14-3 from the switch to the fan. Disconnect neutral from attic to the fan and use neutral from the switch.
 
  #2  
Old 03-10-20, 05:44 AM
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You cannot do that. Feed and return from the switch must be in a single cable or conduit. (Either 2 hots entering and leaving the switch or hot and neutral.)

The original wiring probably had switched hot going back to the junction box in the attic and the fan is wired from it. Isn't it?

You have 2 options.

Run 14-3 from the switch to junction box in the attic, then back to the fan.
or
Run 14-2 from the junction box in the attic to the switch (which probably is already there..), then run 14-3 from the switch to the fan. Disconnect neutral from attic to the fan and use neutral from the switch.
 
joed, tiresharkdbb voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 03-10-20, 11:18 AM
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Ok thank you. Yes, it already had 14-2 into the switch, but I used that to pull the 14-3 into the box. I was hoping to make it work with just the 14-3, but sounds like I will need to re-run the 14-2 into the switch, along with the 14-3 out to the fan. Thanks again.

 
  #4  
Old 03-11-20, 04:51 AM
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Green Switch

In life, it seems the biggest gains a person can make are often so obscure, they are easily missed. For instance, sealing your home and using good insulation is boring stuff compared to buying a condensing boiler with radiant floor heat, but the return on investment is so much better. And so, it is with the Green Switch we put in our home, it saves about 50% of our electrical consumption per month.


All a green switch is, is a switch located at the normal entry point of the home, where all unnecessary power is shut off.


In my house, it is by the front door. Whenever no one is occupying the home, we shut that switch off, and it kills 90% of the power in the house. This does a lot because it not only kills phantom electrical loads, it kills all loads for 90% of the house. This can be whatever you want it to be, like for us, the water pumps so if we have a busted water line, we do not come home to a flooded house. Or our electric wall oven, there is no chance of ever leaving that on. And the same for the water heater, or other appliances. And it should prevent electrical fires because 90% of the wiring in the house is deenergized when we are not home.


The ten percent that does not get shut off, is what we call “forever power”, which for us are the outside lights, the refrigerator outlet, the furnace outlet, etc; things you always want to be powered up. I wired every room in the house to have at least one forever-outlet, so like in my daughter’s bedroom, she can have her fish’s heater and air pump plugged in.


It does take a bit of planning to figure out what will be forever power, and what will be shut off at the green switch, but the cost is very cheap, just an extra load box by the front door, or the door leading to the garage, to kill the majority of the power. It takes some extra wire too, but the cost is really recovered quickly because we are saving about 50% per month.


It is not very glamourous, not some new high-tech solar panel on the roof, windmill in the back yard, or fission generating flux capacitor in the basement…but it does save me a lot of money. So, I encourage people to install a green switch if they can.

But if you really want the fission generating flux capacitor, you can find that on the autozone website. (no joke)
 
 

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