Adding Outlet to GFCI Wired to Junction

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Old 03-31-20, 03:16 PM
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Adding Outlet to GFCI Wired to Junction

Would like to know if it's ok to wire in another outlet from an existing GFCI kitchen outlet. The GFCI outlet wires directly into a junction box in the basement. The junction has two other runs from it. One to a duplex outlet used for a window AC, on to an exterior GFCI outlet and then to a switch for an outdoor security light . The other brings in the power with one duplex outlet in between. I know there is a certain order in which GFCI's should be wired. Not sure if this wiring set up complicates things.
 
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Old 03-31-20, 03:44 PM
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Kitchen receptacles are supposed only serve the kitchen.
 
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Old 03-31-20, 04:00 PM
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The outlet I would like to add will be for the kitchen. The current GFCI outlet is situated right where the only place for the dish drain can go. So I rarely use it and keep plastic protectors in it to prevent wet utensils and cookware from coming in contact with it. My hope was to add an outlet more towards the end of the same counter in a safer and more functional location.
 
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Old 04-01-20, 07:18 AM
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Hi, the new outlet would have to be connected to the load side of the existing GFCI receptacle, may not be possible from that J box, beside the fact that kitchen circuits are supposed to be for kitchen only.
Geo
 
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Old 04-01-20, 09:55 AM
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It doesn't need to be on the LOAD side if you install a GFCI receptacle at the new location.
 
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Old 04-01-20, 10:00 AM
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The OP stated an existing GFCI receptacle , I believe .
 
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Old 04-01-20, 12:32 PM
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The OP stated an existing GFCI receptacle , I believe .
It still doesn't need to be connected to the LOAD. It can be a separate GFCI.
 
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Old 04-01-20, 01:03 PM
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If I'm understanding correctly, because the GFCI receptacle is wired from a junction box that feeds other areas, I can not add another receptacle?

It's a small older home, most of the main part of the house is only on 2 circuits. Kitchen is actually the exception with about 5 and if it wasn't for that part of the basement ceiling being exposed, I would not have known of the junction box and/or how the other runs were all connected.
 
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Old 04-02-20, 10:41 AM
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because the GFCI receptacle is wired from a junction box that feeds other areas, I can not add another receptacle?
You're in sort of code gray-area. Since the house was built years ago, the kitchen receptacles being shared with other loads was acceptable and code-compliant at the time. There's no requirement to upgrade to the current code requirements until you are significantly renovating the kitchen. But since your new receptacle is an addition, it should technically be under current code.

The most code-compliant way would be to run a new 20A circuit to this new kitchen receptacle. BUT... many electricians would do what you have planned and just add another kitchen receptacle on the current circuit under the assumption that it's closer to a repair than a new installation.

In my opinion, as long as it's GFI protected and you're not having tripping issues currently, I wouldn't have an issue with adding another receptacle on the current circuit.
 
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Old 04-02-20, 05:47 PM
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Choice of:: iwire up a GFCI receptacle from the line side terminals of the existing (GFCI) receptacle, or, wire up an ordinary receptacle from the load side terminals of the existing receptacle.

The ultimate goal is to have two 20 amp branch circuits serving just receptacles on kitchen counter, kitchen elsewhere, dining room,and/or pantry, with some receptalces from each circuit on the counter.

Currently y ou have circuits serving the counter and also various unknown locations.By running a brand new 20 amp circuit to the counter you have progressed towards the goal. From what you described, it is not mandatory to install the second dedicated 20 amp receptacle for the counter now.

If two wires want to go under one screw, cut a short length of wire (called a pigtail when both ends are in the same box) and connect that to the screw. Connect the other end of the pigtail to the other two wires in question. (Two wires of the same size could go under one screw provided they do not touch each other and neither could slip sideways out from under the screw sligthly before the screw is tightened.)
 
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Old 04-08-20, 05:06 PM
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Thanks for your advice everyone! Think I'll dwell on this one a bit. I'm a bit nerved finding that this circuit is on the same circuit as a 8k BTU window AC in another part of the house, even if it is only used 3-4 months out of the year. On the other hand, the area I wanted to add the outlet is only used to plug in the phone, it's too small for anything else. Ideally, I would rather just move the existing outlet over about a foot or so, but it's the wire in flexible metal. There's no slack to pull it over.
 
 

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