Wiring my shed from my house

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Old 04-02-20, 07:05 PM
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Wiring my shed from my house

I want to run electricity to my shed from my house, it's going to be a workshop for welding and woodworking.
Can someone let me know what wire, breaker, and conduit ill need? I need to run the wire underground from my main panel to a sub-panel in the shed. the shed is about 65ft away.

The shop will have:
Welder
15 amp jobsite table saw
mitresaw
2 led lights
4 receptacles

Thanks a lot.
 
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Old 04-02-20, 08:58 PM
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60 amp sub panel should be fine unless you have some sort of huge welder.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 05:05 AM
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Need to verify the welder requirements, it's the big amp draw!
 
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Old 04-03-20, 05:52 AM
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Knowing what size welder you want to run does help deciding the feed size. That being said I believe a 60A feed will most likely suit your needs with no problem. I would use 3 conductors of #4 Al XHHW-2 and 1 conductor of #8 Al XHHW-2 for the feed wires fed from a 60A breaker in the main panel. As a minimum use 1 inch PVC conduit. Individual conductors need to be in conduit from panel to panel. Get a small 100A Main breaker panel for the subpanel. You need to place 2 ground rods at the shed 6ft apart on a single #6 Cu conductor hooked to the ground bar in the subpanel. Most likely you'll need to buy a ground bar kit for the subpanel because the neutrals need to be isolated from grounds which means removing the bonding strap from the neutral bar to the subpanel case.

Edit: Conduit need to be buried with 18 inches of cover. Knowing your location would help. Code requirements differ based on location.
 

Last edited by pattenp; 04-03-20 at 06:25 AM.
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Old 04-03-20, 09:49 AM
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I was under the impression a 40 amp breaker in the main panel and a #8 nmd90 in the conduit to the shed is sufficient.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 09:55 AM
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Old 04-03-20, 10:17 AM
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Conductors or cables installed in wet locations (conduit outside or buried is a wet location) is required to be rated for wet locations. I do not think NMD90 is rated for wet locations.

40 amp will likely be fine as that is all I have to my shop. However, that would be close to the limit. I agree with Joed and install #6 copper wire and a 60 amp fuse/breaker.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 11:34 AM
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Being 65ft you should consider aluminum. There is nothing wrong with the use of aluminum conductors when doing a feeder. The cost is less than half of copper. Do not let issues of aluminum of years ago worry you. Today's aluminum alloy for wire is safe.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 12:21 PM
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Today's aluminum alloy for wire is safe.
When properly installed.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 02:12 PM
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NMD90 is for dry. You can't use that underground in conduit. You need NMW for wet locations.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 02:38 PM
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Shoot! I wish I knew that before I bought the cable. I got nmd90 my friend in school for electrical said that would be good because my only other option at the store was #8 nmw60. he said I shouldn't get anything rated lower than 75 degrees. Shouldn't have listened to him I guess.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 03:10 PM
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Also ground rods are not required for detached buildings in Canada.

Add your location to your profile. It helps quoting the proper rules.
 
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Old 04-03-20, 03:41 PM
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When properly installed.
The same can be said for copper.
 
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