Household fuses: dryer issue

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Old 04-21-20, 05:47 PM
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Household fuses: dryer issue

My clothes dryer keeps blowing fuses, especially when I run the dryer on medium or high. The problem MIGHT be that I've been using old fuses. However, here is my question: In my fuse-box, there is a set of two 30-amp cartridge fuses dedicated for the clothes dryer. I have been using NON time-delay fuses. Might there be some benefit in my trying time-delay fuses? The time-delay fuses cost considerably more, but the package says they are "Heavy Duty Fuses," whereas the NON time-delay ones says "General Purpose Fuses." (Both are the same amp, and both say "250 Vac") I don't want to take a chance on burning my house down!
By the way, I always keep the lint-filter clean on the dryer, and I recently cleaned out the outdoor exhaust pipe.
 
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Old 04-21-20, 06:21 PM
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I normally recommend time-delay fuses unless a manufacturer says not to use them. There is no danger to use time delay for your dryer as they will both blow if too much current flows through them.

That said, you may be having some other issue. A normal electric dryer should run at about 22-24 amps. Well below what the fuse is rated for, time-delay or fast-acting.
 
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Old 04-21-20, 11:01 PM
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Most electric dryers have one heating element. Then there is a thermostat or two that control cycling.
That means that the heat setting should not cause the unit to use any more power on high than low.

It is possible you have a dryer with a dual heating element.
That could be confirmed with the appliance model number.

As Tolyn mentioned..... the dryer should be running well under the fuse rating.
Typically what happens is that the fuse holders get weak and the fuses run hot. That heat can cause the fuses to blow prematurely. Check the pullout cartridge for heat discoloration.

You should only be losing one fuse. Is that correct or are both blowing ?
Check them when they come out with an ohmmeter to confirm they are both bad.
 
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Old 04-22-20, 11:11 AM
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I would want to know exactly how many amps is being drawn on each leg on the circuit. I think I'd install time delay fuses and with a clamp meter, check current draw on both legs. Anything over 24 amps and you have another problem with the dryer.
 
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Old 04-24-20, 02:07 PM
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Only one is blowing at a time. Thanks for all the helpful replies!
 

Last edited by MIKEMCD77; 04-24-20 at 02:29 PM.
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Old 04-24-20, 02:31 PM
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That's what I figured.
The heating element runs on 240v but the motor runs on 120v.
The fuse that is blowing is probably the one that has the motor on it.

Did you check for discoloration of the fuseholder.
 
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Old 04-24-20, 02:36 PM
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None have blown recently (since I used some newer fuses), If another one blows, then I'll replace the fuse HOLDER. Thanks!
 
 

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