Pulling wires in EMT and stranded vs solid

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Old 04-22-20, 06:42 PM
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Pulling wires in EMT and stranded vs solid

I am installing a new 20 amp branch circuit in our backyard using the existing subpanel that powers our pool equipment. I plan to run #10 THWN wire in EMT to mitigate voltage drop (the outlet furthest from the panel is about 70' of wire away). This leads to some questions:

1. I've been thinking I should use stranded wire to make the pulling easier (the worst pull will be about 15' long and involve a bit more than 270 of bends). Any suggestions on making my life easier pulling the wire?

2. I've also thought about using solid #12 as a pigtail from a wirenut in each box to make the connection to the outlet easier (because the wire gauge is smaller) and more reliable (because it's solid wire and not stranded). Any thoughts on that idea?

3. I plan to run the EMT through a concrete brick wall pillar that's part of our back fence. I'll drill a hole that's slightly larger than the EMT O.D. and slide the EMT through. The code allows EMT in concrete as long as it's protected from corrosion. I imagine this is required when concrete is poured around the EMT and not in my circumstance where the EMT might rest against existing concrete? If not, how would I protect from corrosion?

Thank you!
-Eric
 

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04-23-20, 01:21 PM
Zorfdt
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I would definitely use stranded. Pulling solid through anything that isn't straight is doable... but a challenge.

One trick I read somewhere (no idea where) is to reverse twist the wires before forming them into the hook to attach to a device. By twisting them reverse (counter-clockwise looking at the cut end), it twists against the clockwise rotation of the screw and makes them less likely to splay apart when you tighten the screw on the device.

Or use pressure-plate devices, where the wire goes in a hole in the back and is trapped between a tightening plate. Like how many GFI receptacles are now.
 
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Old 04-22-20, 07:33 PM
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At 70' I doubt upsizing the wire is necessary, but there is nothing wrong if you want to.

1) For an easier pull, push a fish tape in first. It is also helpful to have a leader on the tape for getting around bends. If you are using #10 use stranded. #10 solid is very stiff. After you get the fish tape through tie the wires to the fish tape and have a helper feed the wire in while you pull on the tape pulling in the wire.

2) That is fine as long as the circuit is not protected by larger than a 20 amp breaker.

3) That is fine.

Just to cover all the bases:
All conduit must be installed before pulling in any wires.
Conduit must be continuous, using proper fittings from box to box.
There can be no more than 360 degrees between boxes or pull fittings.
 
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Old 04-22-20, 07:39 PM
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If you upsize the current carrying conductors to #10 the ground also needs to be upsized to #10.
 
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Old 04-23-20, 04:56 AM
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Hi, why not use PVC instead of EMT ?
Geo
 
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Old 04-23-20, 07:42 AM
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Use wire lube, and a helper pushing while you pull helps a lot. I love the look of EMT, but don't use it where it is in dirt.
I just did a 90 foot pull of 3x stranded #10 in 3/4" pvc with 2x 90 sweeps; that was quite easy solo.
Also, I use a marine (yellow Hubbel) 15A receptacle, and it was rated for #10 wire directly.
 
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Old 04-23-20, 01:21 PM
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I would definitely use stranded. Pulling solid through anything that isn't straight is doable... but a challenge.

One trick I read somewhere (no idea where) is to reverse twist the wires before forming them into the hook to attach to a device. By twisting them reverse (counter-clockwise looking at the cut end), it twists against the clockwise rotation of the screw and makes them less likely to splay apart when you tighten the screw on the device.

Or use pressure-plate devices, where the wire goes in a hole in the back and is trapped between a tightening plate. Like how many GFI receptacles are now.
 
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Old 04-23-20, 01:37 PM
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Last year we pulled (4) #6 through 1" PVC, 50', stranded, (2) 90;s. A little conduit lube, no issues.

Solid would have been tough!
 
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Old 04-23-20, 02:49 PM
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Thanks for all the tips and suggestions, I appreciate the responses!

why not use PVC instead of EMT ?
I was planning to use PVC at first, but the entire run of conduit will be above ground and visible throughout the yard. I thought the EMT would look much better, especially since it won't sag like PVC would. It's also nice that EMT only needs support every 10', where PVC needs it every 3'. There are a couple of spots where it was a pain to get supports installed due to vegetation. There was a learning curve with the bender, but I'm now fairly proficient at making what I need out of EMT, so I don't think using EMT slows me down all that much (although it definitely did at first). Raintight couplings and connectors are easy to find, and I think a bit easier to use than PVC couplings and connectors (and could be taken apart when I made mistakes along the way). About 80% of the conduit is already installed, and it does look sharp...I'm very happy with the decision to use EMT based on that. I'm getting ready to order the wire I need, since I expect to have the conduit installation completed in the next few days. All the answers here will help a lot.
 
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Old 04-23-20, 05:18 PM
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I never use lube when pulling wire in EMT. It only makes a mess and IMO is unneeded using modern "superslick" THHN/THWN wire.
 
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Old 04-23-20, 06:16 PM
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I hope the EMT doesn't trust out too quickly.
 
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Old 04-23-20, 06:17 PM
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I hope the EMT doesn't trust out too quickly.
 
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Old 04-24-20, 09:53 AM
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I never use lube when pulling wire in EMT. It only makes a mess and IMO is unneeded using modern "superslick" THHN/THWN wire.
Lube is rarely ever needed anymore with SIMpull from Southwire.

https://www.mysouthwire.com/medias/S...MGYxNmNhMGM1Yg
 
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  #13  
Old 04-24-20, 12:29 PM
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I just tried the wire pulling WAX that is out now. Just as messy going on, but seems to clean itself up in a few days so the wire itself is not at all slimy. Steel is a lot slipperier for me than PVC.
 
 

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