20A duplex receptacle

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Old 04-26-20, 09:32 AM
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20A duplex receptacle

Hello,
I am installing electric in an addition, and have got a question I can't find an answer to in the books I have and searching online. The instructions on the box of receptacles I bought seem to conflict with the guide books I have. A 20A duplex receptacle - right now it's for the bathroom circuit, GFCI breaker-protected circuit. The diagram with the package shows the outlet being wired, in what to me seems upside-down. Why would they show it this way - is that how it should be wired, for some reason?

Also, the packaging mentions that if the circuit is continuing downstream, 'pass-through' wiring should be used. Does this mean I can't (or shouldn't) route the incoming 12/2 onto one set of screws and the outgoing 12/2 onto the other set of screws?

Thank you for any information you can provide.
 

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04-27-20, 03:17 PM
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An object could also hit the ground and the hot causing the same issue. If this was such an issue the code would have addressed it years ago. Proposals for this get rejected everytime.

Also AC does not have a positive and a negative. Those terms are for direct current DC.
 
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Old 04-26-20, 09:57 AM
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There is no upside down. A receptacle can be mounted in any orientation that suits you.
If you only have two cables to attach to the receptacle, I would use the screw terminals. Many others will disagree and tell you to use pigtails but it not any safer or required.
 
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Old 04-26-20, 10:21 AM
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The GFI receptacle has the ability of protecting downstream receptacles. So when you install the GFI receptacle you need to decide if the wiring that leaves that location needs to be protected.

If the outgoing wiring is not being protected..... all wiring goes to the two line screws.
If the outgoing wiring is being protected..... incoming power goes to line and the outgoing circuit connects to load. Each screw location has room for two wires.

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Old 04-27-20, 04:56 AM
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...GFCI breaker-protected circuit...
If this circuit is protected by a GFCI breaker there is no need to install a GFCI receptacle. The entire circuit is already GFCI protected by the breaker.

Unless I am missing something here?
 
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Old 04-27-20, 10:15 AM
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when the GFCI is installed it will have the ground pin on top, hot and neutral on the bottom (upside down) .

This is the reasoning for it:
An upside-down position may also help to reduce the risk of electrical shock in some applications. In the ground pin down configuration, if a metal object were to fall on a loose plug – the object will
more easily contact the positive and negative pins causing a short and possible fire.


 

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Old 04-27-20, 03:17 PM
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An object could also hit the ground and the hot causing the same issue. If this was such an issue the code would have addressed it years ago. Proposals for this get rejected everytime.

Also AC does not have a positive and a negative. Those terms are for direct current DC.
 
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Old 04-29-20, 09:13 AM
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A 20A duplex receptacle - right now it's for the bathroom circuit,
No need for a 20 amp rated duplex receptacle when a 15 amp rated duplex is all that is needed. 15 amp duplex receptacles are rated for 20 amp feed-thru when used on 20 amp circuits.
 
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Old 04-29-20, 10:19 AM
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I have yet to own a 120V 20 A plug. Some wall mount air conditioners may use these.
But today I just installed a 30A 120V twist lock at the dock. These are very common.
 
 

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