Outlet question

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-07-20, 07:18 PM
W
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: minnesota
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Outlet question

We are planning on selling our house it was built in 1929, In the city where i live we have a truth in housing program so i need find an inspector to schedule an inspection. I know they check outlets for proper wiring
I have a three prong outlet that i checked and the device shows an open ground, i pulled out the outlet and there is a ground wire connected to the box from the receptacle. I still have plenty of two prong outlets so I am wonder if i should replace this with a two prong, I just wonder if an inspector will pick up on it. I have plenty of two prong outlets through out the house and I also have some 3 prong, Any thoughts?
 
Sponsored Links

Popular Reply

 
05-07-20, 08:12 PM
joed
joed is offline
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,525
Received 237 Votes on 208 Posts
Two prong receptacle or GFCI are code compliant solutions.
 
  #2  
Old 05-07-20, 08:12 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,525
Received 237 Votes on 208 Posts
Two prong receptacle or GFCI are code compliant solutions.
 
CasualJoe, PJmax voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 05-07-20, 09:31 PM
L
Member
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,441
Received 58 Votes on 53 Posts
You probably don't have ground wire.

You have 4 options.
1. Rewire whole house.
2. Run separate ground wire to each junction boxes.
3. Install GFCI receptacles or breakers. You can install a GFCI receptacle at the first receptacle and run the rest on load terminal. You should label receptacles "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND" This stickers are usually supplied with a GFCI receptacle.
4. Just keep 2 prong. New home owners may not like that, but it is legal to keep it as is.
 
  #4  
Old 05-09-20, 07:17 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: U.S.A.
Posts: 60
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Option 3 may be the best.

Purchasers might feel assured that the home doesn't need an immediate upgrade to be safe.

Many old two prong receptacles are worn, have lost their grip. Replacing with new three prong ungrounded receptacles (protected by GFCI) gives a safer situation, until a better solution (rewiring) can be implemented. However, depending on your building inspection rules (AHJ), this might be considered as requiring Arc Fault protection.
 
  #5  
Old 05-10-20, 03:28 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,640
Received 85 Votes on 75 Posts
You can install a GFCI receptacle at the first receptacle and run the rest on load terminal. You should label receptacles "NO EQUIPMENT GROUND" This stickers are usually supplied with a GFCI receptacle.
Installing a GFCI receptacle at the location of the first receptacle on each circuit is definitely an option, but will be a real challenge in an older home likely with knob & tube wiring. Assuming you have an updated modern circuit breaker panel, this might be a good time to opt for the more expensive GFCI breakers rather than the less expensive GFCI receptacles. The labor savings alone would be tremendous. Another issue I see is that there are never more than a few "No Eqpt. Ground" stickers provided with each GFCI receptacle and no one makes them so you would probably also have to buy a small label maker.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: