Split kitchen counter receptacles

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  #1  
Old 05-08-20, 04:42 AM
Q
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Split kitchen counter receptacles

The old NEC and current CEC allowed this but I don't understand the purpose when there are 2 receptacles. Electricians often wired a 14/3 to the first and then another 14/3 to the second receptacle. So you would end up with the top 2 plugs in A and B and then the bottom two on B and A.
However, how does that really help, someone could simply start 2 devices on both As and still trip the breaker?
 
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Old 05-08-20, 08:48 AM
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It helps when a lot of load exists in one location - think one receptacle being more convenient to use than the other.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 10:59 AM
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Many people have their coffee maker and toaster sitting next to each other. Maybe the microwave there too.
Kitchens that are wired with circuit A on the left side and circuit B on the right, would have no way to handle this without rewiring the kitchen.
Simply plugging the toaster into the top and coffee maker into the bottom receptacle would fix any overload issue.

Now, whether it's the "best" solution is a whole different argument. It's made more difficult with GFI receptacles.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 02:53 PM
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Multi branch became much less desirable with the single handle rule, IMO.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 03:35 PM
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Multi branch became much less desirable with the single handle rule, IMO.
And with the AFCI requirements.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 05:46 PM
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I have never seen it as a problem since 3 split receptacles was a minimum. That would be 6 circuits so any that were doubled up would likely not be a problem.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 06:25 PM
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The split receptacles I'm talking about are 2 circuits 2 receptacles.
It's not 4 circuits.
 
  #8  
Old 05-08-20, 07:01 PM
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I know that. But there would also be at least two more split circuits if the kitchen was wired properly since there was a minimum of 3 MWBC split circuits required in kitchen wiring.
 
 

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