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Wiring a double switch and double receptacle in 2 gang box

Wiring a double switch and double receptacle in 2 gang box

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Old 05-08-20, 06:37 PM
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Wiring a double switch and double receptacle in 2 gang box

Is one way considered "Correct" when wiring a double switch with a common feed and a double outlet in a 2 gang box:
Method 1: Common Hot Feed that enters box to Double Switch Hot Screw (Don't break connector tab) - connect short black wire to 2nd Hot Screw of Double Switch & then connect that to hot screw of double receptacle
Method 2: Separate Pigtails from Common Hot Feed that enters box - one to Hot Screw of Switch, one to Hot screw of Receptacle

Method 1 eliminates an extra wire and the need for a pigtail with a wire nut.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 08:16 PM
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Either one is fine and code compliant.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 08:21 PM
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Agreed.... but with one slight change.
I'd bring the power into the receptacle first and then to the switch.
 
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Old 05-08-20, 09:03 PM
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What is your reasoning why?
 
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Old 05-08-20, 09:46 PM
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You draw more current thru the receptacle. Connecting power to the switch first allows two more additional points for possible problems.
 
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Old 05-09-20, 07:40 AM
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Trying to understand - why would the current be different depending on where the hot wire feeds?
 
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Old 05-09-20, 09:30 AM
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Your plugged in device can draw up to 15A amps thru your receptacle.
Your lights are only an amp or two.
 
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Old 05-09-20, 12:09 PM
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So wouldn't a device plugged into the receptacle be more likely to draw more amperage prior to the switch and "mess" up the lights rather then the other way around?

Other then preference is it "wrong" to go from the switch to receptacle rather then the receptacle to the switch?
 
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Old 05-09-20, 12:54 PM
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So wouldn't a device plugged into the receptacle be more likely to draw more amperage prior to the switch and "mess" up the lights rather then the other way around?
No.
--------------------------------------------
Other then preference is it "wrong" to go from the switch to receptacle rather then the receptacle to the switch?
No.
 
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Old 05-09-20, 04:30 PM
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All connection types - wire nuts or screw terminals -are rated for full current. It is a matter of personal preference which one you use. I use screw terminals when available. I wire the shortest route from panel when pulling cables. If the switch is closer go there first. If the receptacle is closer go there first.
 
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