New outlet required for range hood

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  #1  
Old 05-10-20, 10:02 PM
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New outlet required for range hood

Our old range hood (noisy and ineffective) fan motor stopped working, so I bought a new fan motor insert which is a plug in type. When I took the old one out, i discovered that it was hard wired.
So for the new one I need an outlet, can i just buy a (metal?) outlet box for old work, put it in the drywall where the wires are coming out of and use the existing wiring (seen in the pic - i don't know why but the image posted horizontally but the original was vertical) and install a receptacle for the new hood?

Thanks
 
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Last edited by newhome10; 05-10-20 at 10:06 PM. Reason: image orientation
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Old 05-10-20, 10:21 PM
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I bought a new fan motor insert
Are you replacing just a fan assembly or are you replacing whole hood? Your picture looks like the hood is completely removed.

Fan motor with plug is usually for bathroom fan. I have never seen a hood fan motor with a plug. If you are sure the one you bought will fit and will run at the correct speed, check if attached cord is long enough to reach splice box of the hood. If so, just cut the plug off and splice in there.
If it doesn't reach, you can cut the plug off and extend using heat shrink butt splice (self soldering one will be the best) or solder and heat shrink over.
Using wire nut is not recommended inside fan as grease will collect in it.


If you are replacing whole hood assembly, you should put a outlet inside cabinet above. You cannot just put a outlet and plug behind hood.
 
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Old 05-11-20, 06:21 AM
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Sorry for the confusion, yes I am changing the entire assembly. There is no cabinet above the hood, it's a wooden decorative hood. It only has the insert (fan and motor), liner, exhaust going up to the ceiling and the decorative wooden cover. This is what I bought and it came with a plug. So I should just install an outlet above the hood with a metal box? I have never really done much of any electrical work, although I'm handy.

Thanks
 
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Old 05-11-20, 06:37 AM
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Install an outlet. Do not cut off plug and hardwire splice. That is not an approved method plus soldering line voltage connections to building wire is not approved. Splices need to have mechanical connections.
 
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Old 05-11-20, 09:25 AM
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yes I am changing the entire assembly. There is no cabinet above the hood, it's a wooden decorative hood. It only has the insert (fan and motor), liner, exhaust going up to the ceiling and the decorative wooden cover.
I just did something similar last year with a Broan exhaust fan/light insert in an existing custom wood range hood. The Broan insert also came with a cord/plug. I installed a receptacle inside the adjacent cabinet toward the top and plugged the insert in there.
 
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Old 05-11-20, 05:56 PM
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For the type of hood you purchased, it is best to install a outlet in adjacent cabinet. You can also install it above the hood if you can make is accessible (ie. removable panel)


Do not cut off plug and hardwire splice. That is not an approved method plus soldering line voltage connections to building wire is not approved.
Yes. Do not solder onto building wiring.
I was referring to the fan/motor assembly that sits inside housing.


 
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Old 05-11-20, 09:19 PM
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Sounds like installing an outlet in the adjacent cabinet is the way to go. I have a few more questions:
1). Can I use the existing wire, run it through a hole in the adjacent cabinet and install an outlet there. I attached a pic to show the way I intend to run the wire. If so, can I just staple it to the drywall along the way to the cabinet?
2). When I do make a hole, can I use the same hole to run the wire from the breaker and the hood power cord or do I have to make 2 separate holes, does it even matter?
3). What type of outlet do I get for this? As an example, another cabinet has an outlet that is exposed and seems like it's all metal. If you have a link or a description of what this type of outlet is called, that would be great.

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-12-20, 05:24 AM
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1). If your wire is long enough, you can use existing wire. You can run it outside of drywall so long as it will not interfere with hood.
I see 2 cables for the outlet in the cabinet. Check if your existing outlet is what is feeding cable to the hood. If it is, you could disconnect cable running to the hood and just use existing outlet.

2). You can use same hole so long as the hole is big enough.

3). You can use pretty much any type of junction box as long as you can safely install an outlet. I prefer low profile surface mount box like this. It is made for wiremold raceway, but you can also run wire from back or side.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Wiremold...W2-D/100544174

It is harder to install, but looks better.
 
 

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