SEP spare breakers


  #1  
Old 05-18-20, 04:00 PM
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SEP spare breakers

I'm meeting with the GC and electrical sub tomorrow. I still can't find an answer about an NEC requirement for at least two empty (spare) spaces on a newly installed SEP. The GC said that he thinks that requirement was done away with some time ago. Does anyone know what the right answer is?
 
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Old 05-18-20, 05:50 PM
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Might have been a local code. More likely some inspector's wish list.

What's a SEP?
 
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Old 05-18-20, 06:04 PM
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Not an NEC requirement. .
 
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Old 05-19-20, 04:27 AM
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Astuff
SEP = Service Electrical Panel is my guess
 
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Old 05-19-20, 04:39 AM
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There's been dozens of post on this site and any DIY site where someone is asking what to do when they trying to add something and there panel is full.
EG: running a new line to a shed or garage, mini split, tankless water heater, charge for an electric car, ect.
So required or not it's nice to have.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 04:47 AM
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Hi, at one time it was suggested 1 spare for every 5 circuits, when designing a electrical system, makes sense as.
Geo
 
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Old 05-19-20, 05:21 PM
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According to our Canada member, it is a requirement per CEC, but not NEC.

IMO it is not needed as it is fairly easy to add a sub-panel. Even when a panel is full.
 
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Old 05-19-20, 07:06 PM
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Tolyn -

I absolutely agree that it is easy to install a sub panel except the electrician will want more money for this. Instead of installing a larger breaker box for an additional $50 or so he completely filled a cheaper panel and will want more money for a sub panel to provide power for the garage and any future expansion.

Typical contractor - he did not ask what I wanted ( I would have agreed to pay more) . Instead he just took the cheapest route.
 
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Old 05-20-20, 05:37 PM
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What size/brand panel was installed? 200 amps? 30 space 60 circuit? etc. You can find anything on the internet but contractors shop at local stores and electrical suppliers. The choices can be limiting.
 
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Old 05-21-20, 05:33 AM
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It's a GE 200 amp, 32 space sold at big box stores. Yesterday I was shopping at HD and checked out the panel. On the shelf right next to the 32 space box was a 40 space box for about $25 more.
 
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Old 05-21-20, 07:47 AM
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It's a GE 200 amp, 32 space sold at big box stores.
There's a good possibility that's a 32-40 panel (32 space-40 circuit). GE has made them for years and they were quite popular among those who bought GE loadcenters. I would recommend you check the label inside the panel door carefully, you may not have a problem after all. Another way to check is to look at the circuit breakers approved for use in the panel. If Type THQP breakers (half size) are listed it is a 32-40 panel.
 
 

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