Dead riding lawnmower battery

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  #1  
Old 05-21-20, 10:49 AM
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Dead riding lawnmower battery

I left the battery connected throughout the winter by mistake. The water levels seem fine.
however, at first the smart charger just registered a fault, I left out the on the power supply setting to try and get some voltage in. On connecting a meter it reads 1.6V but then immediately drops to 0.
The charger no longer registers a fault but it thinks it is at almost 100% capacity so I left it on trickle charger overnight but still not getting any voltage reading. Anything to try?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-21-20, 12:04 PM
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How old is the battery? ...
 
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Old 05-21-20, 01:37 PM
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Time to buy a new battery.
 
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Old 05-21-20, 02:08 PM
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If a lead-acid battery remains in a fully discharged condition for a long time it is dead, kaput, fubar, toast.

You might be able to get it back to 12 volts or 6 volts or whatever it was rated for but chances are it will go back to discharged after only a small amount of power draw.
 
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Old 05-21-20, 02:33 PM
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A true dead battery is truely dead. Time to replace it. Next time remove the battery at the end of the mowing season, put it on a shelf (not on a concrete floor) and if you have one, connect a trickle charger. I learned all that after replacing batteries every year. My last lawn tractor battery was probably 5 or 6 years old.
 
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Old 05-21-20, 02:50 PM
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put it on a shelf (not on a concrete floor)
This is not necessary anymore. This was true back wen the battery case was made out of wood and quality of plastic wasn't so good. Plastic house is non conductive and will not drain the battery.
However, you do need to keep top of the battery clean. Dust and grease collected on top of the battery can create a path for current to flow and slowly discharge the battery.


It is ok to keep the battery connected to riding mower because there are no standby devices. It is only used for starting and head lights. So long as you keep the key turned off, it wouldn't be any different from disconnecting the battery.
I suspect your battery is just old and is time to replace.

Just make sure it is fully charged at the end of the season. Lead acid batteries should be topped of at least every 6 months.
 
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Old 05-21-20, 02:55 PM
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It's about 5 years old. Just trying to squeeze some extra out of it
 
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Old 05-21-20, 03:27 PM
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Time to buy a new battery.
As prior post indicates, 5 years is not unusual, but you killed it so look for a sale at TS!
 
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Old 05-21-20, 03:28 PM
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5 years is a good life for a battery. Time for a new one.
You didn't say how many amps the charger you used was. But a high amp charge might kick it over for one more season.
 
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Old 05-21-20, 03:59 PM
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15a but because it's a smart charger it won't actually charge it. Need to get it up to 12V before it really does anything.
 
  #11  
Old 05-21-20, 04:41 PM
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5 years. You had very good life out of your battery.
Walmart is cheapest place to buy battery. At least around where I life.

Smart chargers won't charge unless your battery has some voltage. Most probably will require at least 6V.
You can try charging it off your car battery with jumper cable.
 
  #12  
Old 05-22-20, 03:42 AM
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Use a meter.
First check the battery voltage
Then hook up the charger and check across the terminals again.
Are you actually getting a charge voltage?

Smart chargers are great for quick charging but most of them are useless on a dead or very low battery.
I have an old trickle charger and by old I mean about 50 years that I use to bring a dead battery up to a point where my newer smart charger can actually charge it.
 
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Old 05-22-20, 04:08 AM
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If you left it out all winter, most likely it also froze several times. That will kill a battery. But as others have said the unit is old. % years is real good.

Also that storing on concrete as CW mention is no longer a problem. But I still keep off the floor only because it won't get kicked around.
 
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