The US electrical system is not 120V

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Old 06-22-20, 05:20 PM
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The US electrical system is not 120V

Found a reasonably good YouTube explanation of circuit breakers.
The YouTube channel is pretty good, but I found this to be a good introduction.

The US electrical system is not 120V
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMmUoZh3Hq4
 
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Old 06-22-20, 05:42 PM
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What is interesting is the slow raising of voltage over the years. I just heard Of 125/216V systems mentioned by a POCO engineer in the last month.
 
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Old 06-22-20, 05:44 PM
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I just finished watching before I saw this post. LOL

Pretty good video without going too technical.
 
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Old 06-22-20, 05:51 PM
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At the very least he is very entertaining. I like the way he presents things.

But are we considered that bad in Europe? And what makes their plugs and outlets so called safer?

I suspect our system is a lot more flexible.

 
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Old 06-22-20, 06:07 PM
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Our plugs are smaller. If you've ever tried to pack light for a trip you don't want anything with that big honk'n plug. I do like the plastic coating half way up the blades though so you don't get that tingling sensation.
 
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Old 06-22-20, 06:12 PM
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I do like the plastic coating half way up the blades though so you don't get that tingling sensation
Never saw that. Never experienced a tingle when plugging in appliances.

How about the new twist and insert plugs (or should I say receptacles)? Supposedly no contact unit it's firmly inserted all the way
 
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Old 06-22-20, 07:03 PM
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The US electrical system is not 120V
That's correct.

Our system is 120/240v and that's what it's called.
Entertaining..... maybe.
 
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Old 06-23-20, 02:53 AM
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I'm not sure what this guys point was, if he had one. I've been plugging in stuff for a lot of years and never, ever got a shock from the exposed prongs on a plug. I've also lived in Europe twice (admittedly the last time was 30 years ago) and I was not impressed with their residential electricity.
 
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Old 06-23-20, 11:26 AM
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There is the anecdotal story how that if a knife falls it can short out on a standard North American plug. EU plugs won't do it as they are recessed. UK plugs are almost always ground up. The coated section on the prongs is belt and suspenders.

For the other aspect: If you put your fingers on the blades as you plug something in you simply should not be allowed to live unsupervised.
 
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Old 06-23-20, 01:18 PM
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But ... the predominant household voltage for individual lights or electronic devices or appliances used in the U.S. is approx. 120.

I am not sure whether this 125/216 volt 3 phase system is standardized or just set that way in specific installaions due to fluctuating voltage drop after the pole transformes over moderately long distances and widely varying loads.
 
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Old 06-23-20, 05:11 PM
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Itís pretty confusing. I see networked oil filled vault transformer ratings at 216/125V secondary to be used to supply 208/120V rated systems.
 
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Old 06-23-20, 07:01 PM
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It's not uncommon to see strange voltages...... but not typically in a house.
 
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Old 06-24-20, 10:14 AM
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ratings at 216/125V secondary to be used to supply 208/120V
Other than voltage considerations in transformer ratings (a nominal 200+ volt rating would not be used on a 400+ or higher volt system without eventual issues--overheating, insulation breakdown, etc.) the rating is just a ratio. If you do the math you will see that a 208 volt input to a 216/125 transformer will produce 120 volts on the low side.
 
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Old 06-24-20, 04:13 PM
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European stuff is 50 hertz. Ours is 60 hz. Our heart is 60 hz. With 50 hz there are a lot less zero crossing incidents.
 
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Old 06-24-20, 04:55 PM
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I got to the point where the guy said something about how everybody has concerns about the NA electrical system.

Sorry, must have missed that on the late night news over the past several months!
 
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Old 06-24-20, 06:55 PM
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@2john... these transformers I referenced take primary voltages of 13kV. These so-called networked systems have a number of these transformers, with their secondaries tied together to offer redundancy in case a feeder goes away. Usually done in highly urbanized systems, all wiring underground.
 
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Old 06-25-20, 04:59 AM
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Red face

Yeah, I was concentrating on the low voltage part of your comment that most people on this forum would be dealing with. I overlooked the
networked oil filled vault transformer
part.

Sorry for any confusion.
 
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