Recommending a Furnace Surge Protector

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Old 07-11-20, 03:43 PM
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Recommending a Furnace Surge Protector

Can anyone recommend a good surge protector for my furnace? It is just 120v and the circuit board I want to protect. And I already have a whole house surge, but that doesn't cut it. I still blow out point of use protectors after a power outage is restored. Thanks!
 
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Old 07-11-20, 06:20 PM
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Something like this should work. I've used these on HVAC units.
https://www.supplyhouse.com/Intermat...ector-120-240V
 
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Old 07-12-20, 07:57 AM
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Thanks, I will get one. Can you give the scoop what you mean about protecting HVAC units? What I want to protect:

--Downstairs AC compressor on a 2 pole 20A breaker. (The blower is the same 120v which blows heat also and I will protect with the circuit board unit you suggested.)

--Upstairs AC compressor on a 2 pole 40A breaker, plus the blower on a 2 pole 15A breaker.

So where do I actually install the surge devices? I also have exterior pull out disconnects for the compressors. Thanks!
 

Last edited by Gen; 07-12-20 at 08:24 AM.
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Old 07-12-20, 08:54 AM
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I already have a whole house surge,
I believe I would just upgrade the whole house surge device you already have and be done with it.
 
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Old 07-12-20, 08:59 AM
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I typically don't install point-of-use surge protectors on standard HVAC systems. While the control board is a sensitive area, my personal experience is that it's not worth the extra cost. I do install them on mini-split heat pump systems as their control boards are more complex and significantly more expensive to replace. But of course, it's ultimately your call.

These point-of-use protectors would be installed in the disconnect/switch for whatever device you're looking to protect. In a typical forced air system, I would install it at the disconnect switch closest to the blower unit as this is the unit that contains the control board and is connected to your (probably electronic) thermostat. In your case, I would install two, one on the 120v line in the basement and one in the attic at each indoor unit.

I would not bother installing one on an outside compressor, as there's nothing exceptionally sensitive in a compressor unit.
 
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Old 07-12-20, 12:25 PM
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OK CJ...

regarding the whole house surge, I have panel breaker type 30 Cutler Hammer Surge CH230SUR/205475997 Admittedly I don't know the rating of this.

Would I be better off with perhaps this? CHSPT2ULTRA-1/204761136

Or how do the ratings compare? Thanks!
 
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Old 07-12-20, 01:21 PM
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The way surge protection works is to protect any 2 adjoined areas. Since the utility area is off limits to customers you should install a unit at the electrical service and one at the point of use.
I use the second unit at my service and then a unit that has the highest joules that I can afford for the point of use.

Even doing this nothing is guaranteed. Surges and spikes are only separated by time. Surges are slower. We are discussing the speed of light so slower is a matter of micro seconds over pico seconds. This gets real fuzzy real fast.
Ignore anything that says the company will pay for any damage. It is next to impossible to prove.
 
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Old 07-13-20, 09:00 AM
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regarding the whole house surge, I have panel breaker type 30 Cutler Hammer Surge CH230SUR/205475997
That's the one I would normally go with, but you seem to have a special circumstance if you are still getting damaging surges past it. I believe the CHSPT2ULTRA is a little better, but considering the issues you have had I think I'd go better with a Intermatic IG2240-IMSK which has a 10 year product warranty and $50,000 connected equipment warranty. There are various places to buy one of these online, here is one.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Intermati...ules/700389086

Amazon has the same unit except their price is about $65 higher.


How old is the current CH230SUR surge device you have? It has a 5-year limited product warranty and $25,000 home connected equipment warranty.
 
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Old 07-16-20, 10:14 AM
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It's hard to recommend action without a root cause on what failed. Are the defects in the power circuit or in the control (thermostat) area? Big difference in how to approach the problem. A mains only solution won't help the LV control side. Remote garage door openers have a similar problem. Many lightning issues relate to voltage spikes on the door sensors and/or the control buttons. Look at the Liftmaster plug-in surge protector. It protects both the mains side and the control side. I'd be tempted to even use that device on a HVAC system, and run the thermostat wires to the the protector as well as the mains. It has special terminals for the control lines.
Also, its a bit disturbing to see that power restoration is causing your issue, and not local or atmospheric conditions. So called "slow oscillatory wave" can propagate on power lines, and is usually the result of POCO switching events. MOV based systems can still attenuate these transients. However, "high line" issues are best attacked using on-line UPS systems. MOV's will not protect against prolonged high line events, caused by upstream voltage regulation out of control, as one example.
 
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