Soldering - is galvanic corrosion a concern here?

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-29-20, 10:16 AM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 172
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Soldering - is galvanic corrosion a concern here?

I want to ground this ethernet surge protector. The protector's wire is fairly short. To reach the grounding line that runs from my main panel to my plumbing, I was thinking I'd solder a piece of 12g copper wire to the spade connector on the surge protector. I'm not sure what material the spade connector is made of and was wondering if galvanic corrosion would be a concern?

 
Sponsored Links

Popular Reply

 
07-30-20, 05:16 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Tolyn Ironhand
Tolyn Ironhand is offline
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,503
Received 175 Votes on 157 Posts
so you are saying if the surge is big enough that the solder can heat up and melt thus breaking the path to ground?
Exactly. It is not only on ground wires, it applies to all wires. If there is a short circuit that can heat up wire enough to melt the solder and make the connection fail.
 
  #2  
Old 07-29-20, 11:09 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 23,059
Received 534 Votes on 491 Posts
Your spade connector is likely plated copper so it should solder well to the copper grounding wire. Or, you can cut off the connector and solder copper wire to copper wire.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #3  
Old 07-29-20, 11:23 AM
Marq1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA MI
Posts: 6,130
Received 320 Votes on 300 Posts
Galvanic corrosion requires dissimilar materials (the more difference the more corrosion) and an electrolyte, typ water or very high humidity!
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #4  
Old 07-29-20, 02:20 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,449
Received 212 Votes on 188 Posts
You don't have to ground it to the line from the panel to the water line. You can ground it to any point on the electrical system ground.
 
  #5  
Old 07-29-20, 02:34 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 172
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Yeah, I know. But since the ethernet cable enters the house close to the panel, might as well ground here and provide a very short path to ground, especially since the whole point is to minimize damage from lightning induced surge.
 
  #6  
Old 07-29-20, 07:18 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 57,809
Received 938 Votes on 875 Posts
Slightly off topic......
Grounding or bonding the Ethernet cable isn't really effective.
You want to ground or bond the source of the Ethernet..... usually the cable modem (or whatever you have) in which case it's more important to make sure the cable is grounded.
 
  #7  
Old 07-30-20, 08:28 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,579
Received 32 Votes on 31 Posts
I would not solder to the wrong side of a forked terminal. this is a job for a crimp butt connector.

I have done some EMC work with Ethernet copper. The jacks contain a small transformer that kills CM surge and noise. I do no special treatment for short runs of copper to about 30'. If its a very noisy environment, then go with a shielded system. For very long runs, go with optical. Many copper to fiber boxes out there for 802.3
 
  #8  
Old 07-30-20, 03:26 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,503
Received 175 Votes on 157 Posts
If there is a surge there is a possibility that the solder will fail. This is the exact reason why soldering splices are not allowed by the NEC. You are better off using a mechanical connector such as a split bolt, wire nut, or butt splice.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #9  
Old 07-30-20, 04:14 PM
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Trumbull, CT, USA
Posts: 541
Received 17 Votes on 17 Posts
@ Tolyn Ironhand:
I always wondered what was NEC's reason for no soldered connections allowed so you are saying if the surge is big enough that the solder can heat up and melt thus breaking the path to ground?

I do remember (Way before my time though) in the Knob & Tube days those connections were soldered and taped into a big bunch with friction tape.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #10  
Old 07-30-20, 05:16 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,503
Received 175 Votes on 157 Posts
so you are saying if the surge is big enough that the solder can heat up and melt thus breaking the path to ground?
Exactly. It is not only on ground wires, it applies to all wires. If there is a short circuit that can heat up wire enough to melt the solder and make the connection fail.
 
cartman, CircuitBreaker voted this post useful.
  #11  
Old 07-30-20, 05:48 PM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,579
Received 32 Votes on 31 Posts
UL has a similar issue with soldered ground wires. If a device catches fire, they want the ground connection to stay intact. Thus, no soldered ground wires even inside Class 1 devices.
 
cartman voted this post useful.
  #12  
Old 07-30-20, 06:43 PM
C
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 172
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
If there is a surge there is a possibility that the solder will fail. This is the exact reason why soldering splices are not allowed by the NEC. You are better off using a mechanical connector such as a split bolt, wire nut, or butt splice.
Thanks. Definitely unaware of that.

I had cut off the spade connector and soldered the device's copper wire to my 12g copper wire. But I'll snip off that wire and join the wires using a wire nut instead.
 
  #13  
Old 07-31-20, 11:58 AM
D
Member
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: us
Posts: 791
Received 21 Votes on 21 Posts
When replacing breakers on old crowded panel with GFI and Arc-Fault breakers I needed to extend some of the white ground wires.

First spliced wires with crimped connectors, then soldered crimp finally covered area with white shrink wrap tubing.

Splice is more reliable than just crimping and less likely to deteriorate through corrosion or whatever. Connection barely noticeably. Positioned splice wires behind others in panel so are not visible.

As a salt water boater have long crimped then soldered electrical connections.
 

Last edited by doughess; 07-31-20 at 12:24 PM.
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: