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Fried Outlet Surge Protectors even with Whole House Protector?

Fried Outlet Surge Protectors even with Whole House Protector?

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Old 08-06-20, 08:52 PM
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Fried Outlet Surge Protectors even with Whole House Protector?

Had power surge during recent storm. Fried 5 Surge Protectors. Have Whole House Surge Protector rated 80,000 A. Anyone know why a Whole House Surge protector would not prevent the surges at 5 outlets on 2 circuits? Thankfully no damage to any major appliances. Whole house Surge protector still indicating that it is still good.Thanks for any info.
 
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Old 08-07-20, 06:43 AM
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Whole house surge protectors only can handle up to a certain point if it's a power surge from the power company. If it's a lighting strike then all bets are off. I've had people installing optical cable bore through my house and neighbors house service cable and take out my whole house protector and some outlet protectors. The end result is I had no damaged equipment that was attached. The neighbor had no surge protection and lost a couple TV's, refrigerator, stove, etc.
 
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Old 08-07-20, 10:21 AM
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Guess it was a good thing I have House Protector. Several neighbors lost their ovens during the storm and they did have protectors. Guess I just was lucky!
 
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Old 08-07-20, 12:16 PM
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At the levels of a couple thousand amps, these surge protectors are clamping at around 500 Volts +/-. And, they might survive if the event lasts not much more than a tenth of one millisecond. Lightning consists of usually several strikes of around 50 to 100 microseconds each. The larger devices at the service can deal with much more energy than the small guy at the receptacle.

They are just one piece of the protection system. You do need to start with a very good grounding and bonding system. AT the pole and at the house. And, the pole needs these MOV based protectors also. In my neighborhood, every pole has a protector on the primary side. Unfortunately, not all poles are connected to a local ground rod. The problem usually gets worse when old poles get swapped for new ones. For some reason, the vertical ground reconnect sometimes gets ignored.
 
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Old 08-09-20, 09:22 AM
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Thanks for any info.
I thought about this one a while and keep coming back to the obvious. How is your electric service grounded? Do you have one ground rod or two? Do you have a Grounding Electrode Conductor connected to within 5 feet of where your water service enters the house? I would also be interested in knowing the resistance to earth measured at a ground rod.
 
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Old 08-10-20, 07:13 PM
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I noticed 2 grounding cables coming out of breaker box. One goes to water meter, the other to a water line. How would I check the resistance? Thanks
 
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Old 08-11-20, 11:37 AM
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I noticed 2 grounding cables coming out of breaker box. One goes to water meter, the other to a water line
Depending on when your panel/service was installed, there have been changing requirements for grounding.
Way back when, there just needed to be a connection to the water piping, anywhere.
Nowadays, proper grounding/bonding requires a connection at the meter (with a jumper across the meter) and 2 ground rods.

How would I check the resistance?
Unfortunately, there's not an easy method for testing resistance to ground. You need a Megger (megohm meter), which aren't cheap. Many electricians don't even have one or have a need for one.
 
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Old 08-11-20, 11:42 AM
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Electric Com. Won't Tell U this But If You ask Them to Protect Your Home
from Surges they are Producing . .
Or Place a Transformer that has Better Clamping ,,
They will NORMALLY place a Main Power Surge that is
able to Clamp Larger Loads or Melt - ( It Cost $30.00 ) Bucks in TN

Plus If it Ever Fails - They Replace it for Free !
 
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Old 08-11-20, 11:47 AM
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Also U may look into Weather or NOT Your Older Telephone Lines are Grounded to Box
As Many Telephone Companies took Short Cuts back then - just Grd. to Box
It (( Back Feeds )) ~ ~ ~ /\ /\ ~ ~ ~ as it happens so Fast ..then might last 8-12 seconds with many Large Hits.
 
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Old 08-12-20, 01:37 PM
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There's a reason they call it a "surge" protector instead of a "lightning strike" protector.

A lightning bolt is nothing but a spark of static electricity, just like what zaps you if you scuff your feet across a carpet in the winter and then touch a doorknob. What makes it so dangerous is there's so much electrical potential involved that it can jump a YUGE gap through air, which is normally a very capable insulator. The coil-style ignition system in old-fashioned gasoline engines creates at least 5000 volts to make a spark jump an air gap than's only a small fraction of an inch. Lightning jumps air gaps of hundreds of feet. And just how big do you reckon the air gap is in your all-house surge suppressor?

In essence counting on a surge protector to ward off damage from lightning strikes is playing the odds. It's not going to protect against the full brunt of a direct hit but direct hits are rare. When it reaches the ground the lightning bolt's energy fans out in all directions searching for its path of least resistance, and its power gets divided up among all those paths. So it might protect you if the electrical potential has been divided up into enough separate paths, and if the path that leads to your house provides adequate resistance to flow, and if the surge suppressor lives up to the manufacturer's claims.

Unfortunately, it sounds like you were at least one if short.
 
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Old 08-13-20, 02:32 PM
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Thank You for this advice, I will definitely contact Delmarve Power Company here in Delaware. They need to take at least some responsibility!
 
  #12  
Old 08-17-20, 07:39 PM
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Everyone in My Area has Pulled The Old Telephone BS Grounds ..to Box after I pulled are's

Next Up - have Your Box Inspected First , by someone You Know .. as Electrical Co , Finds 1 or two
semi Loose Wires it' will be Lawyers & Hell NO !
 
 

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