Recently added circuit breaker

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Old 08-21-20, 01:20 AM
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Recently added circuit breaker

I recently added a circuit breaker and installed a receptacle in the garage DIY. Should I have used AFCI circuit breaker? Should I have it permitted and inspected to be correct?
 
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Old 08-21-20, 06:02 PM
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I moved your question to its own thread so that it gets the attention it deserves.

As far as I can recall a garage is not a location that requires AFCI protection. The receptacle, however, does need to be a GFCI in a garage.

Typically any electrical work requires a permit and inspection(s). But your local authority (city, county, state) will have the final say on that.
 
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Old 08-22-20, 12:54 PM
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Thank you. I didn't know GFCI is required in the garage. The electrical work was posted here and done according to the advices. So I know it is done right. Just GFCI was not mentioned then. I will add GFCI immediately. The double gang receptacles are located next to the garage door and closer to the weather. They are used for power tools. GFCI makes sense.

I have another receptacle on a different circuit in the garage, located farthest from the garage door. It is dedicated to a refrigerator. What is the real risk of NOT using GFCI on this outlet? No power tool will be connected to this.

Follow-up question. When a city inspector approves an electrical work, does he leave a stamp or a seal of some kind on the panel? Previous owner did a major electrical work (not DIY) but I don't see anything on the panel.
Thank you.
 
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Old 08-22-20, 02:10 PM
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It is dedicated to a refrigerator. What is the real risk of NOT using GFCI on this outlet?
I do not have any of my fridges or freezers on a GFI protected circuit.... and I don't intend to.
The real risk is losing all the food inside.

If the work was permitted and inspected.... there would have been an inspection sticker. Usually they go on the panel but many GC's I work with stick all the stickers on the house plans which gets given to the homeowner.

You can check with the city to see what inspections were made.
 

Last edited by PJmax; 08-22-20 at 04:39 PM.
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Old 08-22-20, 04:33 PM
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By code all receptacles in a garage must be GFCI. However in the case of a dedicated receptacle for a fridge I would not put a GFCI even though required.
 
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Old 08-22-20, 08:56 PM
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Losing all the food in the fridge is a much greater shock than a little electrical prick as far as I am concerned. Thank you for the explanation.
 
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Old 08-23-20, 06:59 AM
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There are GFCI devices that have an alarm that sounds when they trip if that is something you are interested in.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-...-0KW/206280966

https://www.menards.com/main/electri...5197674681.htm

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Legrand-rad...let/1000272573
 
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Old 08-23-20, 09:57 AM
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Neat. When existing GFCI's go bad, I will replace them with the alarm type. Thank you.
 
 

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