pressure washer capacitor

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Old 09-18-20, 05:11 PM
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pressure washer capacitor

My electric pressure washer stopped turning on. Not even a hum when I plug it in and switch the switch to the on position. Trying to troubleshoot, I discovered that sometimes the capacitor can give out. I looked at the capacitor, it had no physical damage at all, not exploded no sign of burn marks or such. Is it still possible it could be bad, damaged internally perhaps? To see whether this type of capacitor is and I just need to replace it, is it a complicated ordeal or fairly straighforward (perhaps with some guidance/advice) if I have a multimeter? Or does the fact that there is not even a hum when I switch the switch on indicate probably another problem altogether?


 
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Old 09-18-20, 05:22 PM
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It wouldn't be the capacitor. If that was bad the motor would sit there and hum.
You're going to need to check the power cord and switch for continuity.

Look around the motor.... some have a re-settable thermal breaker that's pushed in to reset.

 
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Old 09-18-20, 08:01 PM
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When you let go of the trigger on the wand the pressure goes up very high and the switch is there so the motor doesn't stall. Check the pressure switch that turns off the motor.

I had an electric pressure washer that the exact thing happened twice to two different units. I could never find a replacement so I ended up bypassing it. I just make sure to hold the trigger down whenever the unit is on.
 
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Old 09-19-20, 06:00 AM
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An induction motor has a centrifugal switch that removes the start winding from the circuit soon (less than a second) after the motor starts spinning and reconnects the start winding back into the circuit at a low RPM usually as a result of removing the voltage from the motor ( on/off switch off). The centrifugal switch operator is mechanical and made of steel. It will rust in a wet environment increasing friction that could prevent the centrifugal switch from reclosing, thus preventing the motor from starting next time. The motor end cap must be removed to access the centrifugal switch for cleaning and lubrication. If the centrifugal switch didn't open at startup, more than likely the windings have been damaged beyond repair.
 
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Old 09-19-20, 10:44 AM
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The problem ended up being the pressure switch doohickey exactly like shown/described in this video I found: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhwpMf5hfNQ
Fixed it!


 
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Old 09-19-20, 11:37 AM
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In that video..... the guy had a problem with the actuator getting stuck from corrosion.

It would be just as common to actually have a bad microswitch.
Those switches are inexpensive and are replaceable.
 
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Old 09-19-20, 12:24 PM
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Yes I was almost ready to break down and try to test that on/off rocker microswitch, and if I found it was bad order up a new one for $4.99. But then I came across that video and decided to check for a stuck actuator switch (aka doohickey). Lucked out I'd say on my troubleshooting.

Thanks for all the helpful replies.
 
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Old 09-20-20, 07:30 AM
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That is pretty much the same issue I had on mine posted above but if I recall correctly mine was all bad inside the doodad itself.
 
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Old 09-20-20, 08:54 AM
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In the video, the problem found was gunk/corrosion in that "pressure valve" that was preventing that piston/pin within it from moving enough (or at all) to open/close what the guy in the video calls the "limit switch". This is the same problem I found with my pressure washer. It was not the switch itself gone bad, but rather the valve not functioning to affect the switch. In my previous post this thread I referred to that pressure valve as an "actuator switch" which is incorrect. Nothing wrong with my switch, but rather the "pressure valve" (if in fact that would be the correct terminology for that part).
 
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