How do I run wire to a dishwasher through the floor?

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Old 09-22-20, 07:45 AM
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Question How do I run wire to a dishwasher through the floor?

1972 house. The dishwasher has a hole in the subfloor for the wire, just a drilled hole. No box, nothing. I don't know if that's right or wrong. I need to replace that wire because it got "pinched" and now is having problems. I was going to run 14/2NM "Romex" from the box to replace it. But, I'm not sure it should just come up through a hole like that. Maybe it should. I have no idea.

Should there be a box of some kind there? Should I just run it through the same hole?
 
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Old 09-22-20, 08:31 AM
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As far as I know it can come up through a hole and then the wire is connected in the dishwashers connection bax which should have a strain relief.

You said the old wire got pinched so if this was due in some way to the hole I would make the hole bigger.

 
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Old 09-22-20, 09:26 AM
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No need for a box. Run the new wire up through the hole just like the old one. But do make sure whatever pinched the first one is corrected and you won't have any more problems.
 
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Old 09-22-20, 10:10 AM
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Current code requires a disconnect method, usually in the neighboring cabinet. This is usually accomplished by using a cord and plug and receptacle in the cabinet.

But I do agree with the others, as a repair, you're fine just replacing the cable. Just ensure the old cable is 14ga if you're replacing with 14ga. (Sometimes dishwashers are installed on 20A 12ga circuits).
 
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Old 09-22-20, 05:07 PM
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Current code requires a disconnect method,
With most modern dishwashers the off button/switch on the appliance is acceptable as a disconnect. However, if you want you could add a breaker lock-off device for the panel.
 
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Old 09-22-20, 05:19 PM
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Tonlyn, is that true? I thought since most dishwashers these days are more electronic, there isn't a proper on/off switch which can serve as a disconnect. (Understanding it's a AJH decision in the end)
 
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Old 09-22-20, 06:05 PM
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I know it was true at one time but that may have changed with the appliances these days. I know my dishwasher has an on/off switch. Again, a breaker lock an easy workaround.
 
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Old 09-22-20, 08:07 PM
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With most modern dishwashers the off button/switch on the appliance is acceptable as a disconnect.
Wasn't that only acceptable with old dishwashers with mechanical switches?
With modern dishwashers with digital buttons, part of the circuit is always live, therefore means of disconnect is required. At least that is my understanding of the code.

The code now required GFCI on dishwasher. GFCI receptacle is often cheaper then GFCI breaker to install.
 
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Old 09-23-20, 03:15 PM
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Does that mean I would wire a real 3-prong cord to the Dishwasher junction box and that to the outlet box in the neighboring cabinet that I wire up?
 
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Old 09-23-20, 05:09 PM
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Yes. That is the current code.
However, I wouldn't go that far for just a repair. Just leave enough wire for later conversion.
 
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Old 09-23-20, 05:19 PM
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Wasn't that only acceptable with old dishwashers with mechanical switches?
Maybe but I never have had any issues from inspectors. Although, I mostly do use a cord these days.

Another good example is a wall oven. They are typically hard-wired with no cord to disconnect. Again, I have never had any issues with inspectors wiring it this way.
 
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Old 09-24-20, 10:54 AM
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Can I cut where the current Romex is pinched, strip the wires and use a wirenut and connect another piece of Romex 12/2 to it?
 
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Old 09-24-20, 10:59 AM
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Can I cut where the current Romex is pinched, strip the wires and use a wirenut
Yes. So long as to do the splice in a junction box and the junction box is accessible.
 
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Old 09-24-20, 11:33 AM
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The fundamental problem is how to make the circuit safe if you need to work on the DW. If the disconnect is not in site, and you can't lock out the breaker, then it becomes a "trust me" type of deal. The advantage goes to a cordset appliance for service safety.
Of course, one could make the same argument for any work done to a receptacle or light switch, for instance. Once you consider the device "machinery", and machinery requires maintenance, then the argument gets stronger.
 
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