Replacing a 2 pole breaker with GFCI breaker

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Old 10-06-20, 06:05 PM
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Replacing a 2 pole breaker with GFCI breaker

I am replacing the standard breaker for my electric clothes dryer with a GFCI breaker. The circuit has 2 hots and a neutral. I understand that the neutral should be moved from the neutral bus to the GFCI breaker, but how do I identify the correct neutral from all the other neutrals on the bus?

By the way the existing panel is Challenger by Connecticut Electric. I can't find a Challenger GFCI breaker. Are GE breakers interchangeable?
 
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Old 10-06-20, 06:13 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You cannot use an electric dryer on a GFI breaker using three wires.
You could possibly connect a dryer to a GFI but it would need to be connected with all four wire components. That would four wire plug and cable. Four wire receptacle. Four wire cable from the receptacle to the panel.

If your dryer is currently on three wires..... that means it's combining the ground and neutral on one wire. That will immediately trip a GFI. Your electric dryer is not required to be protected by a GFI breaker.

Now.... are you having an issue that brought this up ?
 
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Old 10-07-20, 06:10 AM
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how do I identify the correct neutral from all the other neutrals on the bus?
By following wire. Just follow wire connected to the breaker to location which cable is running the dryer. Then follow neutral wire on same cable back down.

Type BR from Eaton is compatible breaker to challenger.

If you have 3 wire connection with bare neutral/ground wire, GFCI will trip when that bare wire or the dryer chassis touche anything grounded. So, not such a good idea.
 
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Old 10-07-20, 08:21 AM
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Here is the issue. I am installing a wash tub about 2 feet directly below the receptacle for the dryer. I understand that GFCI protection is required for any receptacle within 3 feet of water.

The wiring for the dryer is in a finished outside wall with insulation and drywall. So there is no way to follow the wires to identify the neutral or change to 4-wire without being a major project. I suppose I could abandon the 3-wire and surface mount 4-wire.

Or surface mount a ground wire to create a 4-wire system.
Or I could move the 3-wire receptacle to avoid the GFCI requirement.
Or I could ignore the GFCI requirement.
Or I could abandon the wash tub.
 
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Old 10-07-20, 08:31 AM
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Its the 2020 code that adds GFCI to some 240 recepts, including in laundry areas. You are not likely on that code rev. Yes, you would have to run 4W to the electric dryer to bring it up to even '90s code first.

I would say bottom line, is make sure at least the local 120V recepts are GFCI, and put in your tub.
 
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Old 10-07-20, 09:32 AM
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Nobody is going to plug anything into the dryer plug besides the dryer. So the tub presents no special risk in my opinion.
 
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Old 10-08-20, 02:50 PM
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Thank you. I am going ahead with wash tub and local 120v GFCI outlets and leave the dryer receptacle as is.
 
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