Relocating breakers and updating generator inlet

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-09-20, 08:23 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Relocating breakers and updating generator inlet

Hello,
I've recently bought a house which needs some things updated (built in 1988). I want to buy a backup generator, but I've been told the current setup is unsatisfactory. What I want to do is replace the current recessed inlet with a proper inlet box, move the top two right breakers below the main breaker and switch them with the double 50A breaker at the bottom ( breaker for inlet), install an interlock kit. Because the 50A is at the bottom, it needs to be relocated beneath the 200A main so that the interlock can function, right? Will it be hard to complete this relocation? The two breakers below the main are for our dining room (1) and a hot tub (2) (hot tub is gone now). I may also need to replace the old hump style main breaker with a flat one. Is this easy enough? If this is possible, I'd like to do it myself. Any advice is welcome and appreciated. Thank you.

Breaker panel w/ old generator outlet below it

Main panel up close

Breaker descriptions

Old outlet that I want to replace with a new male outlet
 
  #2  
Old 10-09-20, 08:49 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,693
Received 47 Votes on 46 Posts
Looks like a reasonable approach, as long as an interlock kit is available and certified for your panel.
 
  #3  
Old 10-09-20, 09:17 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This is the kit I want. It's currently not in stock but they said it would be back soon. I have a Crouse Hinds panel.

https://www.geninterlock.com/product...witch-200-amp/
 
  #4  
Old 10-09-20, 04:33 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 382
Received 26 Votes on 24 Posts
Will it be hard to complete this relocation? The two breakers below the main are for our dining room (1) and a hot tub (2) (hot tub is gone now). I may also need to replace the old hump style main breaker with a flat one. Is this easy enough? If this is possible, I'd like to do it myself. Any advice is welcome and appreciated. Thank you.
Easy enough to relocate the breakers. If the wires to the top two breakers are too short, you can splice in additional length (of same gauge, don't use smaller gauge).

How do you plan on shutting off power to replace the main breaker? Remember, the cable feeding the main breaker is live unless you pull the meter or this panel is a subpanel (in which case, the whole concept of installing the generator breaker here needs to be revisited).
 
  #5  
Old 10-09-20, 05:37 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I didn't think of that. I know they make kits for the hump style breaker, so maybe I need to start looking at those.
 
  #6  
Old 10-09-20, 06:11 PM
C
Member
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 382
Received 26 Votes on 24 Posts
Alternatively, hire an electrician to change the main breaker. An easy and quick job for them.
 
  #7  
Old 10-09-20, 07:03 PM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,569
Received 161 Votes on 143 Posts
You've gotten good answers. One other item to consider is to use a 50A twist-lock (L14-50) inlet as opposed to a standard pin-type 50A inlet (14-50). I find the twist-lock keeps a better connection, especially for larger loads. Of course, either way is code compliant.

Also, you probably know, you need to use a 4-wire inlet/cable instead of the 3-wire that you have now.
 
  #8  
Old 10-11-20, 07:31 AM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks everybody for the advice.
 
  #9  
Old 10-11-20, 05:41 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Another question: the current breaker is a 50A. Should I swap that out for a 30 or 40A? I was looking at the Westinghouse generator that is 1200 starting watts/9500 running watts. I'm not even sure I need something this large, I just want to power as much as I can. Assuming I buy this Westinghouse generator, what you you recommend for a breaker? Also, what gauge wire would you recommend? 8 gauge?
 
  #10  
Old 10-19-20, 08:22 AM
P
Member
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: FL USA
Posts: 56
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am thinking 40amp breaker would be sufficient for a 9500 running-watt generator.
 
  #11  
Old 10-19-20, 09:09 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 60,919
Received 1,347 Votes on 1,245 Posts
You can use the current 50A or downsize to 40A or 30A.
That breaker is only being used as a switch.
The circuit protection comes from the generator breaker.
 
  #12  
Old 10-20-20, 01:58 PM
R
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ok, thanks. So with a 50A outlet, I've been reading that 6 gauge wire is recommended. True? The generator has a 50A and 30A outlet, so I'm still unsure if I should bother with the 50A. I'm having a harder time locating a 50A outlet box, it seems like the 30A or more readily available. But, I'll find the box if y'all think it would be better in the long run.
 
  #13  
Old 10-20-20, 03:18 PM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: United States, Virginia
Posts: 1,513
Received 125 Votes on 99 Posts
Do you mean 50A power inlet, not outlet? 50A power inlets are readily available for generators.
 
  #14  
Old 10-23-20, 12:40 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,765
Received 97 Votes on 87 Posts
I know they make kits for the hump style breaker, so maybe I need to start looking at those.
That's what I'd like to see. As I recall Siemens used to make a flat top 200 amp breaker that would replace some of these hump breakers, but not all of them.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: