Junction box enclosed in the wall

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  #1  
Old 10-15-20, 03:37 PM
J
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Junction box enclosed in the wall

Had a carpenter over today (redoing kitchen) and he said there's now a way to enclose a junction box behind a wall. I want to close off some outlets behind cabinets and I said we'll have to cut an access panel in the cabinet where the outlets are. He said there's now a way to bury wires. I didn't believe him...he's not an electrician.

Is there any way, shape or form this is possible? Thanks.
 
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Old 10-15-20, 04:05 PM
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You are correct. He is wrong.
 
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Old 10-15-20, 04:05 PM
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The junction needs to remain accessible. Do not let them bury a splice.
 
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Old 10-15-20, 04:10 PM
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They do have splice kits available for in wall splicing but they are not reliable.
That's probably what your carpenter was referring to.
 
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Old 10-15-20, 05:23 PM
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@PJmax, are you referring to these?

These are permitted by the NEC, correct?
 
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Old 10-15-20, 06:18 PM
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"These are permitted by the NEC, correct?"

When concealed, they are allowed for repairs only.
 
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Old 10-16-20, 05:13 AM
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So, this thing looks like it will splice 2 cables together, which I assume is what would be needed when removing an outlet in the middle of a run. What about when an outlet is at the end of a run and there's only 1 cable in the outlet box? Can you just connect the one end? Also, do these devices get screwed into the studs where the cable would normally be run down a stud inside a wall? Thanks.
 
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Old 10-16-20, 05:58 AM
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but they are not reliable.
Explain. I don't understand what's not reliable about them. I do understand it's still a concealed splice but how does it make it unreliable and why is this allowed and not a steel box that is totally enclosed?
 
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Old 10-16-20, 06:09 AM
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What about when an outlet is at the end of a run and there's only 1 cable in the outlet box?
Find the other end of the cable and disconnect it. Then you have no issues leaving a dead cable in the wall.
 
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